Laser ablation of organic polymers: Microscopic models for photochemical and thermal processes

Barbara Jane Garrison, R. Srinivasan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

176 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Irradiation of organic polymers by short pulses of far-UV (e.g., 193 nm) laser light causes ablative photodecomposition (APD) of the material. This etching process occurs cleanly leaving behind a well-defined pit. Longer wavelength (e.g., 532 nm) laser light also ablates material from a polymeric solid. However, this process is distinct from APD in that the sample near the pit is distorted and melted. Microscopic models are presented here for both the photochemical and thermal processes. The photochemical model predicts that well-defined pits will be formed, that narrow angular distributions of the ablated material should be observed, and that the average perpendicular ejection velocity will be 1000-2000 m/s. The thermal model predicts melting or distortion of the solid and a broad angular distribution of the ejected material.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2909-2914
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physics
Volume57
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1985

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laser ablation
photodecomposition
polymers
angular distribution
ejection
lasers
melting
etching
irradiation
causes
pulses
wavelengths

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Garrison, Barbara Jane ; Srinivasan, R. / Laser ablation of organic polymers : Microscopic models for photochemical and thermal processes. In: Journal of Applied Physics. 1985 ; Vol. 57, No. 8. pp. 2909-2914.
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Laser ablation of organic polymers : Microscopic models for photochemical and thermal processes. / Garrison, Barbara Jane; Srinivasan, R.

In: Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 57, No. 8, 01.12.1985, p. 2909-2914.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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