Laser-driven decomposition and combustion of 4-amino-1,2,4-triazolium nitrate

Jianquan Li, Thomas Litzinger

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with microprobe sampling was used to obtain gas-phase species from CO2 laserdriven decomposition and combustion of ATAN. The experiments were conducted in argon environment at 1.0 atmosphere with varying laser heat fluxes from 10 to 300 W/cm2. The flame structure and burning event were recorded using a digital camcorder to observe the whole process. The results showed that, at 35 W/cm2, no ignition of the sample can be achieved, but melting accompanied by smoking and bubbling was observed. At 300 W/cm2, the sample burned with a luminous flame preceded by a short time (1-2 seconds) of 'smoke' generation, but self-sustained combustion of the sample was not achieved, requiring laser heating assistance until completion of combustion. The consistently detected species were distributed within a mass range of 2-46; no masses higher than 46 were observed in the current study. Identification of these species was performed with MS/MS, but further analysis and additional experiments are required to verify some of the results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationChemical and Physical Processes of Combustion - 2005 Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute
PublisherCombustion Institute
Pages88-91
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781604235067
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Event2005 Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute: Chemical and Physical Processes of Combustion - Orlando, United States
Duration: Nov 13 2005Nov 15 2005

Other

Other2005 Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute: Chemical and Physical Processes of Combustion
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando
Period11/13/0511/15/05

Fingerprint

Nitrates
nitrates
Decomposition
decomposition
Lasers
lasers
flames
Laser heating
Argon
laser heating
smoke
Mass spectrometers
Smoke
mass spectrometers
ignition
Ignition
Heat flux
heat flux
Melting
quadrupoles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Li, J., & Litzinger, T. (2005). Laser-driven decomposition and combustion of 4-amino-1,2,4-triazolium nitrate. In Chemical and Physical Processes of Combustion - 2005 Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute (pp. 88-91). Combustion Institute.
Li, Jianquan ; Litzinger, Thomas. / Laser-driven decomposition and combustion of 4-amino-1,2,4-triazolium nitrate. Chemical and Physical Processes of Combustion - 2005 Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute. Combustion Institute, 2005. pp. 88-91
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Li, J & Litzinger, T 2005, Laser-driven decomposition and combustion of 4-amino-1,2,4-triazolium nitrate. in Chemical and Physical Processes of Combustion - 2005 Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute. Combustion Institute, pp. 88-91, 2005 Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute: Chemical and Physical Processes of Combustion, Orlando, United States, 11/13/05.

Laser-driven decomposition and combustion of 4-amino-1,2,4-triazolium nitrate. / Li, Jianquan; Litzinger, Thomas.

Chemical and Physical Processes of Combustion - 2005 Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute. Combustion Institute, 2005. p. 88-91.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Li J, Litzinger T. Laser-driven decomposition and combustion of 4-amino-1,2,4-triazolium nitrate. In Chemical and Physical Processes of Combustion - 2005 Technical Meeting of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute. Combustion Institute. 2005. p. 88-91