Laser-GMA hybrid welding

Process monitoring and thermal modeling

Edward William Reutzel, S. M. Kelly, Richard Martukanitz, M. M. Bugarewicz, P. Michaleris

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Laser-Gas Metal Arc (GMA) hybrid welding is an increasingly accepted technology for a variety of commercial applications, from industries as diverse as shipbuilding to automobile manufacture. As applications become more widespread, there is a growing need to understand the relationship between the numerous process parameters and the process results, including weld quality and distortion. To build upon the body of knowledge supporting this, two separate experiments are performed. In the first, hybrid welds are performed with a 2.6kW Nd:YAG laser and sensors are used to monitor GMA voltage and current, as well as the arc-plasma electromagnetic emissions in both the ultraviolet and infrared regions. Process perturbations, such as fluctuations in GMAW voltage and wire speed, laser angle of incidence, and laser/GMAW torch head separation distance, are introduced to study their effect on sensor output. Finally, thermal finite element models are developed and used to quantify the varying heat input per unit length when compared with conventional GMAW and laser welding processes, particularly as applied to joining of thin steel structures. The onset of buckling during weld fabrication has been shown to be strongly dependent upon the heat input used to produce the weld. A thermal model of the laser-GMA hybrid welding process is developed to serve as a representation of this complex process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTrends in Welding Research - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference
Pages143-148
Number of pages6
Volume2005
StatePublished - 2005
Event7th International Conference on Trends in Welding Research - Pine Mountain, GA, United States
Duration: May 16 2005May 20 2005

Other

Other7th International Conference on Trends in Welding Research
CountryUnited States
CityPine Mountain, GA
Period5/16/055/20/05

Fingerprint

Gas lasers
Process monitoring
Gas metal arc welding
Welding
Welds
Lasers
Automobile manufacture
Shipbuilding
Laser beam welding
Sensors
Electric potential
Steel structures
Joining
Buckling
Wire
Infrared radiation
Plasmas
Fabrication
Metals--Gases
Hot Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Metals and Alloys

Cite this

Reutzel, E. W., Kelly, S. M., Martukanitz, R., Bugarewicz, M. M., & Michaleris, P. (2005). Laser-GMA hybrid welding: Process monitoring and thermal modeling. In Trends in Welding Research - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference (Vol. 2005, pp. 143-148)
Reutzel, Edward William ; Kelly, S. M. ; Martukanitz, Richard ; Bugarewicz, M. M. ; Michaleris, P. / Laser-GMA hybrid welding : Process monitoring and thermal modeling. Trends in Welding Research - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference. Vol. 2005 2005. pp. 143-148
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Reutzel, EW, Kelly, SM, Martukanitz, R, Bugarewicz, MM & Michaleris, P 2005, Laser-GMA hybrid welding: Process monitoring and thermal modeling. in Trends in Welding Research - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference. vol. 2005, pp. 143-148, 7th International Conference on Trends in Welding Research, Pine Mountain, GA, United States, 5/16/05.

Laser-GMA hybrid welding : Process monitoring and thermal modeling. / Reutzel, Edward William; Kelly, S. M.; Martukanitz, Richard; Bugarewicz, M. M.; Michaleris, P.

Trends in Welding Research - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference. Vol. 2005 2005. p. 143-148.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Reutzel EW, Kelly SM, Martukanitz R, Bugarewicz MM, Michaleris P. Laser-GMA hybrid welding: Process monitoring and thermal modeling. In Trends in Welding Research - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference. Vol. 2005. 2005. p. 143-148