Laser partial epiglottidectomy as a treatment for obstructive sleep apnea and laryngomalacia

David Goldenberg, Aviram Netzer, Avishay Golz, S. Thomas Westerman, Liane M. Westerman, Frank J. Catalfumo, H. Zvi Joachims

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and laryngomalacia are two different entities. Occasionally, they may have a common etiology: an elongated, flaccid, and lax epiglottis that is displaced posteriorly during inspiration causing airway obstruction. Twenty-seven adults with a diagnosis of airway obstruction or OSA of various degrees, and 12 infants with severe stridor associated with frequent apneas due to laryngomalacia, who on fiberoptic examination were found to have a posteriorly displaced epiglottis, underwent partial epiglottidectomy with a CO2 laser. Their postoperative recovery was uneventful. Polysomnographic studies performed after operation in the adult patients demonstrated statistically significant improvement in 85% of the patients. In all the cases of laryngomalacia, stridor ceased permanently after surgery, together with complete cessation of the apneic episodes. This study demonstrates that similar pathophysiological mechanisms may be involved in both laryngomalacia and in OSA. Effective and relatively safe treatment can be achieved by partial resection of the epiglottis with a microlaryngoscopic CO2 laser.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1140-1145
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology
Volume109
Issue number12I
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Laryngomalacia
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Epiglottis
Lasers
Gas Lasers
Respiratory Sounds
Airway Obstruction
Apnea
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Goldenberg, D., Netzer, A., Golz, A., Westerman, S. T., Westerman, L. M., Catalfumo, F. J., & Joachims, H. Z. (2000). Laser partial epiglottidectomy as a treatment for obstructive sleep apnea and laryngomalacia. Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, 109(12I), 1140-1145. https://doi.org/10.1177/000348940010901211
Goldenberg, David ; Netzer, Aviram ; Golz, Avishay ; Westerman, S. Thomas ; Westerman, Liane M. ; Catalfumo, Frank J. ; Joachims, H. Zvi. / Laser partial epiglottidectomy as a treatment for obstructive sleep apnea and laryngomalacia. In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. 2000 ; Vol. 109, No. 12I. pp. 1140-1145.
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Laser partial epiglottidectomy as a treatment for obstructive sleep apnea and laryngomalacia. / Goldenberg, David; Netzer, Aviram; Golz, Avishay; Westerman, S. Thomas; Westerman, Liane M.; Catalfumo, Frank J.; Joachims, H. Zvi.

In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, Vol. 109, No. 12I, 01.01.2000, p. 1140-1145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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