LASIK: A primer for family physicians

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surgical correction of vision is becoming increasingly popular. Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is the most popular method of corneal refractive surgery. LASIK is usually limited to adults who have stable refraction. Contraindications include the use of certain medications, conditions that impair healing, abnormal corneal anatomy, and inadequate tearing. Patients who cannot tolerate persistent eye dryness or who engage in activities with a risk of eye trauma should avoid LASIK. Possible complications include diffuse lamellar keratitis, epithelial ingrowth, and flap complications. Almost all patients achieve uncorrected visual acuity of at least 20/40, but higher degrees of preoperative myopia may require a second operation. Long-term data on safety and stability are just becoming available. LASIK appears to be safe and effective, with only a small tendency for increased myopia in the first few years after surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-47
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume81
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Laser In Situ Keratomileusis
Family Physicians
Myopia
Refractive Surgical Procedures
Keratitis
Visual Acuity
Anatomy
Safety
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Family Practice

Cite this

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abstract = "Surgical correction of vision is becoming increasingly popular. Laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is the most popular method of corneal refractive surgery. LASIK is usually limited to adults who have stable refraction. Contraindications include the use of certain medications, conditions that impair healing, abnormal corneal anatomy, and inadequate tearing. Patients who cannot tolerate persistent eye dryness or who engage in activities with a risk of eye trauma should avoid LASIK. Possible complications include diffuse lamellar keratitis, epithelial ingrowth, and flap complications. Almost all patients achieve uncorrected visual acuity of at least 20/40, but higher degrees of preoperative myopia may require a second operation. Long-term data on safety and stability are just becoming available. LASIK appears to be safe and effective, with only a small tendency for increased myopia in the first few years after surgery.",
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LASIK : A primer for family physicians. / Messmer, John.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 81, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 42-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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