Late-time X-ray flares during GRB afterglows: Extended internal engine activity

A. D. Falcone, D. N. Burrows, P. Romano, S. Kobayashi, D. Lazzati, B. Zhang, S. Campana, G. Chincarini, G. Cusumano, N. Gehrels, P. Giommi, M. R. Goad, O. Godet, J. E. Hill, J. A. Kennea, P. Mészáros, D. Morris, J. A. Nousek, P. T. O'Brien, J. P. OsborneC. Pagani, K. Page, G. Tagliaferri

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Observations of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) with Swift produced the initially surprising result that many bursts have large X-ray flares superimposed on the underlying afterglow. These flares were sometimes intense, rapid, and late relative to the nominal prompt phase. The most intense of these flares was observed by XRT with a flux > 500× the afterglow. This burst then surprised observers by flaring again after > 10000 s. The intense flare can be most easily understood within the context of the standard fireball model, if the internal engine that powers the prompt GRB emission is still active at late times. Recent observations indicate that X-ray flares are detected in ∼1/3 of XRT detected afterglows. By studying the properties of the varieties of flares (such as rise/fall time, onset time, spectral variability, etc.) and relating them to overall burst properties, models of flare production and the GRB internal engine can be constrained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE SWIFT ERA
Subtitle of host publicationSixteenth Maryland Astrophysics Conference
Pages386-391
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 19 2006
EventGAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE SWIFT ERA: 16th Maryland Astrophysics Conference - Washington, D.C., United States
Duration: Nov 29 2005Dec 2 2005

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume836
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

OtherGAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE SWIFT ERA: 16th Maryland Astrophysics Conference
CountryUnited States
CityWashington, D.C.
Period11/29/0512/2/05

Fingerprint

afterglows
gamma ray bursts
flares
engines
x rays
bursts
fireballs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Falcone, A. D., Burrows, D. N., Romano, P., Kobayashi, S., Lazzati, D., Zhang, B., ... Tagliaferri, G. (2006). Late-time X-ray flares during GRB afterglows: Extended internal engine activity. In GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE SWIFT ERA: Sixteenth Maryland Astrophysics Conference (pp. 386-391). (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 836). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2207925
Falcone, A. D. ; Burrows, D. N. ; Romano, P. ; Kobayashi, S. ; Lazzati, D. ; Zhang, B. ; Campana, S. ; Chincarini, G. ; Cusumano, G. ; Gehrels, N. ; Giommi, P. ; Goad, M. R. ; Godet, O. ; Hill, J. E. ; Kennea, J. A. ; Mészáros, P. ; Morris, D. ; Nousek, J. A. ; O'Brien, P. T. ; Osborne, J. P. ; Pagani, C. ; Page, K. ; Tagliaferri, G. / Late-time X-ray flares during GRB afterglows : Extended internal engine activity. GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE SWIFT ERA: Sixteenth Maryland Astrophysics Conference. 2006. pp. 386-391 (AIP Conference Proceedings).
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abstract = "Observations of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) with Swift produced the initially surprising result that many bursts have large X-ray flares superimposed on the underlying afterglow. These flares were sometimes intense, rapid, and late relative to the nominal prompt phase. The most intense of these flares was observed by XRT with a flux > 500× the afterglow. This burst then surprised observers by flaring again after > 10000 s. The intense flare can be most easily understood within the context of the standard fireball model, if the internal engine that powers the prompt GRB emission is still active at late times. Recent observations indicate that X-ray flares are detected in ∼1/3 of XRT detected afterglows. By studying the properties of the varieties of flares (such as rise/fall time, onset time, spectral variability, etc.) and relating them to overall burst properties, models of flare production and the GRB internal engine can be constrained.",
author = "Falcone, {A. D.} and Burrows, {D. N.} and P. Romano and S. Kobayashi and D. Lazzati and B. Zhang and S. Campana and G. Chincarini and G. Cusumano and N. Gehrels and P. Giommi and Goad, {M. R.} and O. Godet and Hill, {J. E.} and Kennea, {J. A.} and P. M{\'e}sz{\'a}ros and D. Morris and Nousek, {J. A.} and O'Brien, {P. T.} and Osborne, {J. P.} and C. Pagani and K. Page and G. Tagliaferri",
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Falcone, AD, Burrows, DN, Romano, P, Kobayashi, S, Lazzati, D, Zhang, B, Campana, S, Chincarini, G, Cusumano, G, Gehrels, N, Giommi, P, Goad, MR, Godet, O, Hill, JE, Kennea, JA, Mészáros, P, Morris, D, Nousek, JA, O'Brien, PT, Osborne, JP, Pagani, C, Page, K & Tagliaferri, G 2006, Late-time X-ray flares during GRB afterglows: Extended internal engine activity. in GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE SWIFT ERA: Sixteenth Maryland Astrophysics Conference. AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 836, pp. 386-391, GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE SWIFT ERA: 16th Maryland Astrophysics Conference, Washington, D.C., United States, 11/29/05. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2207925

Late-time X-ray flares during GRB afterglows : Extended internal engine activity. / Falcone, A. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Romano, P.; Kobayashi, S.; Lazzati, D.; Zhang, B.; Campana, S.; Chincarini, G.; Cusumano, G.; Gehrels, N.; Giommi, P.; Goad, M. R.; Godet, O.; Hill, J. E.; Kennea, J. A.; Mészáros, P.; Morris, D.; Nousek, J. A.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Page, K.; Tagliaferri, G.

GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE SWIFT ERA: Sixteenth Maryland Astrophysics Conference. 2006. p. 386-391 (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 836).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AU - Falcone, A. D.

AU - Burrows, D. N.

AU - Romano, P.

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AU - Lazzati, D.

AU - Zhang, B.

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AU - Morris, D.

AU - Nousek, J. A.

AU - O'Brien, P. T.

AU - Osborne, J. P.

AU - Pagani, C.

AU - Page, K.

AU - Tagliaferri, G.

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N2 - Observations of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) with Swift produced the initially surprising result that many bursts have large X-ray flares superimposed on the underlying afterglow. These flares were sometimes intense, rapid, and late relative to the nominal prompt phase. The most intense of these flares was observed by XRT with a flux > 500× the afterglow. This burst then surprised observers by flaring again after > 10000 s. The intense flare can be most easily understood within the context of the standard fireball model, if the internal engine that powers the prompt GRB emission is still active at late times. Recent observations indicate that X-ray flares are detected in ∼1/3 of XRT detected afterglows. By studying the properties of the varieties of flares (such as rise/fall time, onset time, spectral variability, etc.) and relating them to overall burst properties, models of flare production and the GRB internal engine can be constrained.

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Falcone AD, Burrows DN, Romano P, Kobayashi S, Lazzati D, Zhang B et al. Late-time X-ray flares during GRB afterglows: Extended internal engine activity. In GAMMA-RAY BURSTS IN THE SWIFT ERA: Sixteenth Maryland Astrophysics Conference. 2006. p. 386-391. (AIP Conference Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2207925