Leisure-time physical activity moderates the longitudinal associations between work-family spillover and physical health

Bora Lee, Katie M. Lawson, Po Ju Chang, Claudia Neuendorf, Natalia O. Dmitrieva, David M. Almeida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous research has documented associations between negative and positive work-family spillover and physical health. Using an effort-recovery model, the study tested the hypothesis that engagement in greater leisure-time physical activity would facilitate recovery processes that buffer the negative health effects of increasing work-family spillover. Employed adults (N = 1,354) completed two waves of the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MI- DUS). Results indicated that an increase in negative work-family spillover across nine years was associated with decreased physical health and increased number of chronic conditions at Time 2. Moreover, more time spent on moderate leisure-time physical activity buffered many of the associations between increasing negative spillover and declining health. Implications of the findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)444-466
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Leisure Research
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

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