Lessons for the United States from countries adapting to the consequences of aging populations

Mark Sciegaj, Richard A. Behr

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aging of the global population is unrivaled in human history. As a result of this demographic transition, developed and developing nations are facing new challenges regarding provision of health and long-term care, economic security programs, and changing informal support structures for elders. This paper is based on a review of the relevant research and policy literature. The paper reports on trends in nine countries that are responding to the consequences of an aging population and presents major lessons for policy makers in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-88
Number of pages6
JournalTechnology and Disability
Volume22
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 25 2010

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Population Dynamics
Long-Term Care
Administrative Personnel
Developed Countries
Population
Developing Countries
History
Economics
Health
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

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Lessons for the United States from countries adapting to the consequences of aging populations. / Sciegaj, Mark; Behr, Richard A.

In: Technology and Disability, Vol. 22, No. 1-2, 25.06.2010, p. 83-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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