Lessons Learned From Ohio's Statewide Implementation of the Preferences for Everyday Living Inventory as a Pay for Performance Initiative to Enhance Person-Centered Care

Katherine M. Abbott, Amy Elliot, Kimberly Van Haitsma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Person-centered care (PCC) in nursing homes is an elusive organizational goal that has attracted the attention of pay-for-performance (P4P) programs. P4P programs are used to incentivize providers to improve the quality of care delivered. However, P4P programs have both overarching policy initiatives (big “P”) that must incorporate an implementation framework that is adaptable in practice (little “p”). The purpose of this paper is to apply six key factors that are central to P4P design in long-term care settings: financial incentives, measurement, stakeholder involvement and alignment, feasibility, education and awareness, and reporting and transparency as a framework for a case study of a P4P initiative conducted in Ohio between 2015 and 2019. Notably, the case study is focused on PCC and how the Ohio Department of Medicaid selected the Preferences for Everyday Living Inventory (PELI) for nursing home providers to use with all of their residents. Although inclusion of the PELI met some of the key factors, such as measurement, its implementation did not meet other key factors, such as reporting and transparency. Based on lessons learned from the Ohio P4P, recommendations are presented for use of the PELI as both a process and outcome measure in future P4P initiatives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2074-2078
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health Policy
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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