Leukocyte profiles for western fence lizards, sceloporus occidentalis, naturally infected by the malaria parasite plasmodium mexicanum

Victoria L. Motz, William D. Lewis, Anne Marie Vardo-Zalik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plasmodium mexicanum is a malaria parasite that naturally infects the western fence lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis, in northern California. We set out to determine whether lizards naturally infected with this malaria parasite have different leukocyte profiles, indicating an immune response to infection. We used 29 naturally infected western fence lizards paired with uninfected lizards based on sex, snout-to-vent length, tail status, and the presence-absence of ectoparasites such as ticks and mites, as well as the presence-absence of another hemoparasite, Schellackia occidentalis. Complete white blood cell (WBC) counts were conducted on blood smears stained with Giemsa, and the proportion of granulocytes per microliter of blood was estimated using the Avian Leukopet method. The abundance of each WBC class (lymphocytes, monocytes, heterophils, eosinophils, and basophils) in infected and uninfected lizards was compared to determine whether leukocyte densities varied with infection status. We found that the numbers of WBCs and lymphocytes per microliter of blood significantly differed (P < 0.05) between the 2 groups for females but not for males, whereas parasitemia was significantly correlated with lymphocyte counts for males, but not for females. This study supports the theory that infection with P. mexicanum stimulates the lizard's immune response to increase the levels of circulating WBCs, but what effect this has on the biology of the parasite remains unclear. .

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)592-597
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Parasitology
Volume100
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

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Sceloporus occidentalis
Plasmodium malariae
Lizards
malaria
Plasmodium
lizard
leukocytes
parasite
Parasites
Leukocytes
lizards
parasites
blood
Lymphocyte Count
immune response
lymphocytes
Malaria
infection
Infection
basophils

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Parasitology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

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title = "Leukocyte profiles for western fence lizards, sceloporus occidentalis, naturally infected by the malaria parasite plasmodium mexicanum",
abstract = "Plasmodium mexicanum is a malaria parasite that naturally infects the western fence lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis, in northern California. We set out to determine whether lizards naturally infected with this malaria parasite have different leukocyte profiles, indicating an immune response to infection. We used 29 naturally infected western fence lizards paired with uninfected lizards based on sex, snout-to-vent length, tail status, and the presence-absence of ectoparasites such as ticks and mites, as well as the presence-absence of another hemoparasite, Schellackia occidentalis. Complete white blood cell (WBC) counts were conducted on blood smears stained with Giemsa, and the proportion of granulocytes per microliter of blood was estimated using the Avian Leukopet method. The abundance of each WBC class (lymphocytes, monocytes, heterophils, eosinophils, and basophils) in infected and uninfected lizards was compared to determine whether leukocyte densities varied with infection status. We found that the numbers of WBCs and lymphocytes per microliter of blood significantly differed (P < 0.05) between the 2 groups for females but not for males, whereas parasitemia was significantly correlated with lymphocyte counts for males, but not for females. This study supports the theory that infection with P. mexicanum stimulates the lizard's immune response to increase the levels of circulating WBCs, but what effect this has on the biology of the parasite remains unclear. .",
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Leukocyte profiles for western fence lizards, sceloporus occidentalis, naturally infected by the malaria parasite plasmodium mexicanum. / Motz, Victoria L.; Lewis, William D.; Vardo-Zalik, Anne Marie.

In: Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 100, No. 5, 01.10.2014, p. 592-597.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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