Lexical difficulty and diversity of American elementary school reading textbooks: Changes over the past century

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a detailed historical analysis of changes in lexical difficulty and diversity of the language used in elementary school reading textbooks widely adopted in the United States during the period 1905-2004. Applying a variety of analytical measures to a 5-million-word corpus of thirdgrade reading texts, we revisit the patterns of change in lexical complexity reported in previous research and examine the trends in more recent decades that have not yet been thoroughly explored. Our findings provide us with rich evidence for challenging some of the historical critiques of the American reading curriculum, and they have important implications for both educational history and policy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-117
Number of pages24
JournalInternational Journal of Corpus Linguistics
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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textbook
elementary school
historical analysis
curriculum
trend
history
language
evidence
Textbooks
Elementary School
History
Language
Curriculum
Historical Analysis
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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