Life and the evolution of Earth's atmosphere

James F. Kasting, Janet L. Siefert

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

250 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Harvesting light to produce energy and oxygen (photosynthesis) is the signature of all land plants. This ability was co-opted from a precocious and ancient form of life known as cyanobacteria. Today these bacteria, as well as microscopic algae, supply oxygen to the atmosphere and churn out fixed nitrogen in Earth's vast oceans. Microorganisms may also have played a major role in atmosphere evolution before the rise of oxygen. Under the more dim light of a young sun cooler than today's, certain groups of anaerobic bacteria may have been pumping out large amounts of methane, thereby keeping the early climate warm and inviting. The evolution of Earth's atmosphere is linked tightly to the evolution of its biota.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1066-1068
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume296
Issue number5570
DOIs
StatePublished - May 10 2002

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Atmosphere
Oxygen
Embryophyta
Light
Biota
Anaerobic Bacteria
Methane
Photosynthesis
Cyanobacteria
Solar System
Climate
Oceans and Seas
Nitrogen
Bacteria

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Kasting, James F. ; Siefert, Janet L. / Life and the evolution of Earth's atmosphere. In: Science. 2002 ; Vol. 296, No. 5570. pp. 1066-1068.
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Life and the evolution of Earth's atmosphere. / Kasting, James F.; Siefert, Janet L.

In: Science, Vol. 296, No. 5570, 10.05.2002, p. 1066-1068.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

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