Life course socioeconomic conditions and adult psychosocial functioning

Sam Harper, John Lynch, Wan Ling Hsu, Susan A. Everson, Marianne M. Hillemeier, Trivellore E. Raghunathan, Jukka T. Salonen, George A. Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Various psychosocial factors have been linked to adult physical health and are also associated with socioeconomic position in adulthood. We evaluated the effect of socioeconomic conditions over the life course on measures of psychosocial functioning in adulthood. Methods. Life course socioeconomic position was assessed by retrospective recall of parents' education and occupation when the respondent was age 10, and the respondents' education, occupation, and income in 2585 men from eastern Finland aged 42, 48, 54, and 60 years. Measures of psychosocial functioning were derived from scales measuring cynical hostility, hopelessness, and depressive symptoms. Results. Men with both parents who had less than a primary school education or who both had unskilled manual jobs had higher age-adjusted levels of cynical hostility, hopelessness, and depressive symptoms in adulthood. Mutually adjusted analyses showed that parents' education and the respondents' education, occupation, and income all had statistically independent effects on adult levels of cynical hostility and hopelessness. For instance, men for whom neither parent had completed primary education had a 0.15 standard deviation (P = 0.006) higher cynical hostility score, and a 0.20 standard deviation (P = 0.00018) higher hopelessness score, after adjustment for education, occupation and income. In contrast, depressive symptoms in adulthood were only associated with the respondent's occupation and income. Conclusions. Childhood socioeconomic position was associated with adult psychosocial functioning, but these effects were specific to some aspects of adult psychosocial functioning-cynical hostility and hopelessness, but not depressive symptoms. Adult occupation and income were associated with all measures of psychosocial functioning. In addition to the impact of adult socioeconomic position, some aspects of poor psychosocial functioning in adulthood may also have socioeconomic roots early in life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-403
Number of pages9
JournalInternational journal of epidemiology
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

Fingerprint

Hostility
Occupations
Education
Depression
Parents
Finland
Psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Harper, S., Lynch, J., Hsu, W. L., Everson, S. A., Hillemeier, M. M., Raghunathan, T. E., ... Kaplan, G. A. (2002). Life course socioeconomic conditions and adult psychosocial functioning. International journal of epidemiology, 31(2), 395-403. https://doi.org/10.1093/intjepid/31.2.395
Harper, Sam ; Lynch, John ; Hsu, Wan Ling ; Everson, Susan A. ; Hillemeier, Marianne M. ; Raghunathan, Trivellore E. ; Salonen, Jukka T. ; Kaplan, George A. / Life course socioeconomic conditions and adult psychosocial functioning. In: International journal of epidemiology. 2002 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 395-403.
@article{8eb2636147a242d4816d7edf8c6a7541,
title = "Life course socioeconomic conditions and adult psychosocial functioning",
abstract = "Background. Various psychosocial factors have been linked to adult physical health and are also associated with socioeconomic position in adulthood. We evaluated the effect of socioeconomic conditions over the life course on measures of psychosocial functioning in adulthood. Methods. Life course socioeconomic position was assessed by retrospective recall of parents' education and occupation when the respondent was age 10, and the respondents' education, occupation, and income in 2585 men from eastern Finland aged 42, 48, 54, and 60 years. Measures of psychosocial functioning were derived from scales measuring cynical hostility, hopelessness, and depressive symptoms. Results. Men with both parents who had less than a primary school education or who both had unskilled manual jobs had higher age-adjusted levels of cynical hostility, hopelessness, and depressive symptoms in adulthood. Mutually adjusted analyses showed that parents' education and the respondents' education, occupation, and income all had statistically independent effects on adult levels of cynical hostility and hopelessness. For instance, men for whom neither parent had completed primary education had a 0.15 standard deviation (P = 0.006) higher cynical hostility score, and a 0.20 standard deviation (P = 0.00018) higher hopelessness score, after adjustment for education, occupation and income. In contrast, depressive symptoms in adulthood were only associated with the respondent's occupation and income. Conclusions. Childhood socioeconomic position was associated with adult psychosocial functioning, but these effects were specific to some aspects of adult psychosocial functioning-cynical hostility and hopelessness, but not depressive symptoms. Adult occupation and income were associated with all measures of psychosocial functioning. In addition to the impact of adult socioeconomic position, some aspects of poor psychosocial functioning in adulthood may also have socioeconomic roots early in life.",
author = "Sam Harper and John Lynch and Hsu, {Wan Ling} and Everson, {Susan A.} and Hillemeier, {Marianne M.} and Raghunathan, {Trivellore E.} and Salonen, {Jukka T.} and Kaplan, {George A.}",
year = "2002",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/intjepid/31.2.395",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "395--403",
journal = "International Journal of Epidemiology",
issn = "0300-5771",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "2",

}

Harper, S, Lynch, J, Hsu, WL, Everson, SA, Hillemeier, MM, Raghunathan, TE, Salonen, JT & Kaplan, GA 2002, 'Life course socioeconomic conditions and adult psychosocial functioning', International journal of epidemiology, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 395-403. https://doi.org/10.1093/intjepid/31.2.395

Life course socioeconomic conditions and adult psychosocial functioning. / Harper, Sam; Lynch, John; Hsu, Wan Ling; Everson, Susan A.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Raghunathan, Trivellore E.; Salonen, Jukka T.; Kaplan, George A.

In: International journal of epidemiology, Vol. 31, No. 2, 01.01.2002, p. 395-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Life course socioeconomic conditions and adult psychosocial functioning

AU - Harper, Sam

AU - Lynch, John

AU - Hsu, Wan Ling

AU - Everson, Susan A.

AU - Hillemeier, Marianne M.

AU - Raghunathan, Trivellore E.

AU - Salonen, Jukka T.

AU - Kaplan, George A.

PY - 2002/1/1

Y1 - 2002/1/1

N2 - Background. Various psychosocial factors have been linked to adult physical health and are also associated with socioeconomic position in adulthood. We evaluated the effect of socioeconomic conditions over the life course on measures of psychosocial functioning in adulthood. Methods. Life course socioeconomic position was assessed by retrospective recall of parents' education and occupation when the respondent was age 10, and the respondents' education, occupation, and income in 2585 men from eastern Finland aged 42, 48, 54, and 60 years. Measures of psychosocial functioning were derived from scales measuring cynical hostility, hopelessness, and depressive symptoms. Results. Men with both parents who had less than a primary school education or who both had unskilled manual jobs had higher age-adjusted levels of cynical hostility, hopelessness, and depressive symptoms in adulthood. Mutually adjusted analyses showed that parents' education and the respondents' education, occupation, and income all had statistically independent effects on adult levels of cynical hostility and hopelessness. For instance, men for whom neither parent had completed primary education had a 0.15 standard deviation (P = 0.006) higher cynical hostility score, and a 0.20 standard deviation (P = 0.00018) higher hopelessness score, after adjustment for education, occupation and income. In contrast, depressive symptoms in adulthood were only associated with the respondent's occupation and income. Conclusions. Childhood socioeconomic position was associated with adult psychosocial functioning, but these effects were specific to some aspects of adult psychosocial functioning-cynical hostility and hopelessness, but not depressive symptoms. Adult occupation and income were associated with all measures of psychosocial functioning. In addition to the impact of adult socioeconomic position, some aspects of poor psychosocial functioning in adulthood may also have socioeconomic roots early in life.

AB - Background. Various psychosocial factors have been linked to adult physical health and are also associated with socioeconomic position in adulthood. We evaluated the effect of socioeconomic conditions over the life course on measures of psychosocial functioning in adulthood. Methods. Life course socioeconomic position was assessed by retrospective recall of parents' education and occupation when the respondent was age 10, and the respondents' education, occupation, and income in 2585 men from eastern Finland aged 42, 48, 54, and 60 years. Measures of psychosocial functioning were derived from scales measuring cynical hostility, hopelessness, and depressive symptoms. Results. Men with both parents who had less than a primary school education or who both had unskilled manual jobs had higher age-adjusted levels of cynical hostility, hopelessness, and depressive symptoms in adulthood. Mutually adjusted analyses showed that parents' education and the respondents' education, occupation, and income all had statistically independent effects on adult levels of cynical hostility and hopelessness. For instance, men for whom neither parent had completed primary education had a 0.15 standard deviation (P = 0.006) higher cynical hostility score, and a 0.20 standard deviation (P = 0.00018) higher hopelessness score, after adjustment for education, occupation and income. In contrast, depressive symptoms in adulthood were only associated with the respondent's occupation and income. Conclusions. Childhood socioeconomic position was associated with adult psychosocial functioning, but these effects were specific to some aspects of adult psychosocial functioning-cynical hostility and hopelessness, but not depressive symptoms. Adult occupation and income were associated with all measures of psychosocial functioning. In addition to the impact of adult socioeconomic position, some aspects of poor psychosocial functioning in adulthood may also have socioeconomic roots early in life.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036100379&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036100379&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/intjepid/31.2.395

DO - 10.1093/intjepid/31.2.395

M3 - Article

C2 - 11980802

AN - SCOPUS:0036100379

VL - 31

SP - 395

EP - 403

JO - International Journal of Epidemiology

JF - International Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0300-5771

IS - 2

ER -

Harper S, Lynch J, Hsu WL, Everson SA, Hillemeier MM, Raghunathan TE et al. Life course socioeconomic conditions and adult psychosocial functioning. International journal of epidemiology. 2002 Jan 1;31(2):395-403. https://doi.org/10.1093/intjepid/31.2.395