Light-cleavable rapamycin dimer as an optical trigger for protein dimerization

Kalyn A. Brown, Yan Zou, David Shirvanyants, Jie Zhang, Subhas Samanta, Pavan K. Mantravadi, Nikolay V. Dokholyan, Alexander Deiters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapamycin-induced protein heterodimerization of FKBP12 and FRB is one of the most commonly employed switches to conditionally control biological processes. We developed an optically activated rapamycin dimer that does not induce FKBP12-FRB dimerization until exposed to light, and applied it to control kinase, protease, and recombinase function. This journal is

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5702-5705
Number of pages4
JournalChemical Communications
Volume51
Issue number26
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 4 2015

Fingerprint

Tacrolimus Binding Protein 1A
Dimerization
Sirolimus
Dimers
Proteins
Recombinases
Peptide Hydrolases
Phosphotransferases
Switches

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Brown, K. A., Zou, Y., Shirvanyants, D., Zhang, J., Samanta, S., Mantravadi, P. K., ... Deiters, A. (2015). Light-cleavable rapamycin dimer as an optical trigger for protein dimerization. Chemical Communications, 51(26), 5702-5705. https://doi.org/10.1039/c4cc09442e
Brown, Kalyn A. ; Zou, Yan ; Shirvanyants, David ; Zhang, Jie ; Samanta, Subhas ; Mantravadi, Pavan K. ; Dokholyan, Nikolay V. ; Deiters, Alexander. / Light-cleavable rapamycin dimer as an optical trigger for protein dimerization. In: Chemical Communications. 2015 ; Vol. 51, No. 26. pp. 5702-5705.
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Brown, KA, Zou, Y, Shirvanyants, D, Zhang, J, Samanta, S, Mantravadi, PK, Dokholyan, NV & Deiters, A 2015, 'Light-cleavable rapamycin dimer as an optical trigger for protein dimerization', Chemical Communications, vol. 51, no. 26, pp. 5702-5705. https://doi.org/10.1039/c4cc09442e

Light-cleavable rapamycin dimer as an optical trigger for protein dimerization. / Brown, Kalyn A.; Zou, Yan; Shirvanyants, David; Zhang, Jie; Samanta, Subhas; Mantravadi, Pavan K.; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Deiters, Alexander.

In: Chemical Communications, Vol. 51, No. 26, 04.04.2015, p. 5702-5705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Deiters, Alexander

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Brown KA, Zou Y, Shirvanyants D, Zhang J, Samanta S, Mantravadi PK et al. Light-cleavable rapamycin dimer as an optical trigger for protein dimerization. Chemical Communications. 2015 Apr 4;51(26):5702-5705. https://doi.org/10.1039/c4cc09442e