Light regulation of pigment and photosystem biosynthesis in cyanobacteria

Ming Yang Ho, Nathan T. Soulier, Daniel P. Canniffe, Gaozhong Shen, Donald Ashley Bryant

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most cyanobacteria are obligate oxygenic photoautotrophs, and thus their growth and survival is highly dependent on effective utilization of incident light. Cyanobacteria have evolved a diverse set of phytochromes and cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) that allow cells to respond to light in the range from ∼300 nm to ∼750 nm. Together with associated response regulators, these photosensory proteins control many aspects of cyanobacterial physiology and metabolism. These include far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP), complementary chromatic acclimation (CCA), low-light photoacclimation (LoLiP), photosystem content and stoichiometry (long-term adaptation), short-term acclimation (state transitions), circadian rhythm, phototaxis, photomorphogenesis/development, and cellular aggregation. This minireview highlights some discoveries concerning phytochromes and CBCRs as well as two acclimation processes that improve light harvesting and energy conversion under specific irradiance conditions: FaRLiP and CCA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-33
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Opinion in Plant Biology
Volume37
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Cyanobacteria
acclimation
pigments
biosynthesis
far-red light
phytochrome
photomorphogenesis
phototaxis
energy conversion
color
stoichiometry
autotrophs
circadian rhythm
physiology
metabolism
proteins
cells

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Plant Science

Cite this

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title = "Light regulation of pigment and photosystem biosynthesis in cyanobacteria",
abstract = "Most cyanobacteria are obligate oxygenic photoautotrophs, and thus their growth and survival is highly dependent on effective utilization of incident light. Cyanobacteria have evolved a diverse set of phytochromes and cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) that allow cells to respond to light in the range from ∼300 nm to ∼750 nm. Together with associated response regulators, these photosensory proteins control many aspects of cyanobacterial physiology and metabolism. These include far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP), complementary chromatic acclimation (CCA), low-light photoacclimation (LoLiP), photosystem content and stoichiometry (long-term adaptation), short-term acclimation (state transitions), circadian rhythm, phototaxis, photomorphogenesis/development, and cellular aggregation. This minireview highlights some discoveries concerning phytochromes and CBCRs as well as two acclimation processes that improve light harvesting and energy conversion under specific irradiance conditions: FaRLiP and CCA.",
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Light regulation of pigment and photosystem biosynthesis in cyanobacteria. / Ho, Ming Yang; Soulier, Nathan T.; Canniffe, Daniel P.; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald Ashley.

In: Current Opinion in Plant Biology, Vol. 37, 01.06.2017, p. 24-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

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AU - Ho, Ming Yang

AU - Soulier, Nathan T.

AU - Canniffe, Daniel P.

AU - Shen, Gaozhong

AU - Bryant, Donald Ashley

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AB - Most cyanobacteria are obligate oxygenic photoautotrophs, and thus their growth and survival is highly dependent on effective utilization of incident light. Cyanobacteria have evolved a diverse set of phytochromes and cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) that allow cells to respond to light in the range from ∼300 nm to ∼750 nm. Together with associated response regulators, these photosensory proteins control many aspects of cyanobacterial physiology and metabolism. These include far-red light photoacclimation (FaRLiP), complementary chromatic acclimation (CCA), low-light photoacclimation (LoLiP), photosystem content and stoichiometry (long-term adaptation), short-term acclimation (state transitions), circadian rhythm, phototaxis, photomorphogenesis/development, and cellular aggregation. This minireview highlights some discoveries concerning phytochromes and CBCRs as well as two acclimation processes that improve light harvesting and energy conversion under specific irradiance conditions: FaRLiP and CCA.

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