Loading of red blood cells with an analyte-sensitive dye for development of a long-term monitoring technique

Sarah C. Ritter, Kenith E. Meissner

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Measurement of blood analytes, such as pH and glucose, provide crucial information about a patient's health. Some such analytes, such as glucose in the case of diabetes, require long-term or near-continuous monitoring for proper disease management. However, current monitoring techniques are far from ideal: multiple-per-day finger stick tests are inconvenient and painful for the patient; implantable sensors have short functional life spans (i.e., 3-7 days). Red blood cells serve as an attractive alternative for carriers of analyte sensors. Once reintroduced to the blood stream, these carriers may continue to live for the remainder of their life span (120 days for humans). They are also biodegradable and biocompatible, thereby eliminating the immune system response common for many implanted devices. The proposed carrier system takes advantage of the ability of the red blood cells to swell in response to a decrease in the osmolarity of the extracellular solution. Just before the membranes lyse, they develop small pores on the scale of tens of nanometers. Analyte-sensitive dyes in the extracellular solution may then diffuse into the perforated red blood cells and become entrapped upon restoration of physiological temperature and osmolarity. Because the membranes contain various analyte transporters, intracellular analyte levels rapidly equilibrate to those of the extracellular solution. A fluorescent dye has been loaded inside of red blood cells using a preswelling technique. Alterations in preparation parameters have been shown to affect characteristics of the resulting dye-loaded red blood cells (e.g., intensity of fluorescence).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationOptical Diagnostics and Sensing XII
Subtitle of host publicationToward Point-of-Care Diagnostics; and Design and Performance Validation of Phantoms Used in Conjunction with Optical Measurement of Tissue IV
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 19 2012
EventOptical Diagnostics and Sensing XII: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics; and Design and Performance Validation of Phantoms Used in Conjunction with Optical Measurement of Tissue IV - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 21 2012Jan 26 2012

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume8229
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Other

OtherOptical Diagnostics and Sensing XII: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics; and Design and Performance Validation of Phantoms Used in Conjunction with Optical Measurement of Tissue IV
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period1/21/121/26/12

Fingerprint

erythrocytes
Blood
Coloring Agents
Dyes
Erythrocytes
dyes
Cells
Monitoring
life span
glucose
Osmolar Concentration
blood
membranes
Glucose
immune systems
transporter
Membranes
sensors
wireless communication
Disease Management

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Ritter, S. C., & Meissner, K. E. (2012). Loading of red blood cells with an analyte-sensitive dye for development of a long-term monitoring technique. In Optical Diagnostics and Sensing XII: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics; and Design and Performance Validation of Phantoms Used in Conjunction with Optical Measurement of Tissue IV [82290Q] (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 8229). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.909039
Ritter, Sarah C. ; Meissner, Kenith E. / Loading of red blood cells with an analyte-sensitive dye for development of a long-term monitoring technique. Optical Diagnostics and Sensing XII: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics; and Design and Performance Validation of Phantoms Used in Conjunction with Optical Measurement of Tissue IV. 2012. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE).
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Ritter, SC & Meissner, KE 2012, Loading of red blood cells with an analyte-sensitive dye for development of a long-term monitoring technique. in Optical Diagnostics and Sensing XII: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics; and Design and Performance Validation of Phantoms Used in Conjunction with Optical Measurement of Tissue IV., 82290Q, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE, vol. 8229, Optical Diagnostics and Sensing XII: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics; and Design and Performance Validation of Phantoms Used in Conjunction with Optical Measurement of Tissue IV, San Francisco, CA, United States, 1/21/12. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.909039

Loading of red blood cells with an analyte-sensitive dye for development of a long-term monitoring technique. / Ritter, Sarah C.; Meissner, Kenith E.

Optical Diagnostics and Sensing XII: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics; and Design and Performance Validation of Phantoms Used in Conjunction with Optical Measurement of Tissue IV. 2012. 82290Q (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 8229).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Ritter SC, Meissner KE. Loading of red blood cells with an analyte-sensitive dye for development of a long-term monitoring technique. In Optical Diagnostics and Sensing XII: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics; and Design and Performance Validation of Phantoms Used in Conjunction with Optical Measurement of Tissue IV. 2012. 82290Q. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.909039