Local cerebral blood flow in the dog during intravenous infusion of dopamine

C. von Essen, N. T. Zervas, D. R. Brown, W. A. Koltun, K. S. Pickren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Local cerebral blood flow was measured in anaesthetized beagle dogs by the hydrogen clearance method. Dopamine was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion of varying doses. The changes in local cerebral blood flow induced by dopamine were similar at the different locations; i.e., the caudate nucleus, thalamus, frontal and parietal cortex. Blood flow responded to dopamine in the following ways: low dose (< 2 μg/kg/min): blood flow decreased or remained unchanged; moderate doses (2-6 μg/kg/min): blood flow increased at all electrodes; high doses (7-20 μg/kg/min): blood flow decreased once again. The decrease in blood flow could be inhibited by the alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonist phentolamine or by the serotonin receptor antagonist methysergide. This indicates that the constrictor effect of dopamine on cerebral blood vessels is mediated via alpha-adrenergic receptors as well as via serotonin receptors. The increase in cerebral flow could be inhibited by the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol, indicating vascular dopamine receptors in the brain with a dilating effect. When the vasoconstrictor activity of dopamine is blocked, the single response to a dopamine infusion is a blood flow increase. This might be beneficial in the clinical situation of symptomatic vasospasm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-188
Number of pages8
JournalSurgical Neurology
Volume13
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 9 1980

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Intravenous Infusions
Dopamine
Dogs
Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha
Blood Vessels
Methysergide
Serotonin Antagonists
Parietal Lobe
Adrenergic Antagonists
Dopamine Antagonists
Caudate Nucleus
Phentolamine
Serotonin Receptors
Dopamine Receptors
Frontal Lobe
Vasoconstrictor Agents
Haloperidol
Thalamus
Hydrogen

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

von Essen, C., Zervas, N. T., Brown, D. R., Koltun, W. A., & Pickren, K. S. (1980). Local cerebral blood flow in the dog during intravenous infusion of dopamine. Surgical Neurology, 13(3), 181-188.
von Essen, C. ; Zervas, N. T. ; Brown, D. R. ; Koltun, W. A. ; Pickren, K. S. / Local cerebral blood flow in the dog during intravenous infusion of dopamine. In: Surgical Neurology. 1980 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 181-188.
@article{3b4fef4797a14ff3ba33110a8e0cf585,
title = "Local cerebral blood flow in the dog during intravenous infusion of dopamine",
abstract = "Local cerebral blood flow was measured in anaesthetized beagle dogs by the hydrogen clearance method. Dopamine was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion of varying doses. The changes in local cerebral blood flow induced by dopamine were similar at the different locations; i.e., the caudate nucleus, thalamus, frontal and parietal cortex. Blood flow responded to dopamine in the following ways: low dose (< 2 μg/kg/min): blood flow decreased or remained unchanged; moderate doses (2-6 μg/kg/min): blood flow increased at all electrodes; high doses (7-20 μg/kg/min): blood flow decreased once again. The decrease in blood flow could be inhibited by the alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonist phentolamine or by the serotonin receptor antagonist methysergide. This indicates that the constrictor effect of dopamine on cerebral blood vessels is mediated via alpha-adrenergic receptors as well as via serotonin receptors. The increase in cerebral flow could be inhibited by the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol, indicating vascular dopamine receptors in the brain with a dilating effect. When the vasoconstrictor activity of dopamine is blocked, the single response to a dopamine infusion is a blood flow increase. This might be beneficial in the clinical situation of symptomatic vasospasm.",
author = "{von Essen}, C. and Zervas, {N. T.} and Brown, {D. R.} and Koltun, {W. A.} and Pickren, {K. S.}",
year = "1980",
month = "5",
day = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "181--188",
journal = "World Neurosurgery",
issn = "1878-8750",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "3",

}

von Essen, C, Zervas, NT, Brown, DR, Koltun, WA & Pickren, KS 1980, 'Local cerebral blood flow in the dog during intravenous infusion of dopamine', Surgical Neurology, vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 181-188.

Local cerebral blood flow in the dog during intravenous infusion of dopamine. / von Essen, C.; Zervas, N. T.; Brown, D. R.; Koltun, W. A.; Pickren, K. S.

In: Surgical Neurology, Vol. 13, No. 3, 09.05.1980, p. 181-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Local cerebral blood flow in the dog during intravenous infusion of dopamine

AU - von Essen, C.

AU - Zervas, N. T.

AU - Brown, D. R.

AU - Koltun, W. A.

AU - Pickren, K. S.

PY - 1980/5/9

Y1 - 1980/5/9

N2 - Local cerebral blood flow was measured in anaesthetized beagle dogs by the hydrogen clearance method. Dopamine was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion of varying doses. The changes in local cerebral blood flow induced by dopamine were similar at the different locations; i.e., the caudate nucleus, thalamus, frontal and parietal cortex. Blood flow responded to dopamine in the following ways: low dose (< 2 μg/kg/min): blood flow decreased or remained unchanged; moderate doses (2-6 μg/kg/min): blood flow increased at all electrodes; high doses (7-20 μg/kg/min): blood flow decreased once again. The decrease in blood flow could be inhibited by the alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonist phentolamine or by the serotonin receptor antagonist methysergide. This indicates that the constrictor effect of dopamine on cerebral blood vessels is mediated via alpha-adrenergic receptors as well as via serotonin receptors. The increase in cerebral flow could be inhibited by the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol, indicating vascular dopamine receptors in the brain with a dilating effect. When the vasoconstrictor activity of dopamine is blocked, the single response to a dopamine infusion is a blood flow increase. This might be beneficial in the clinical situation of symptomatic vasospasm.

AB - Local cerebral blood flow was measured in anaesthetized beagle dogs by the hydrogen clearance method. Dopamine was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion of varying doses. The changes in local cerebral blood flow induced by dopamine were similar at the different locations; i.e., the caudate nucleus, thalamus, frontal and parietal cortex. Blood flow responded to dopamine in the following ways: low dose (< 2 μg/kg/min): blood flow decreased or remained unchanged; moderate doses (2-6 μg/kg/min): blood flow increased at all electrodes; high doses (7-20 μg/kg/min): blood flow decreased once again. The decrease in blood flow could be inhibited by the alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonist phentolamine or by the serotonin receptor antagonist methysergide. This indicates that the constrictor effect of dopamine on cerebral blood vessels is mediated via alpha-adrenergic receptors as well as via serotonin receptors. The increase in cerebral flow could be inhibited by the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol, indicating vascular dopamine receptors in the brain with a dilating effect. When the vasoconstrictor activity of dopamine is blocked, the single response to a dopamine infusion is a blood flow increase. This might be beneficial in the clinical situation of symptomatic vasospasm.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018833582&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018833582&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7368065

AN - SCOPUS:0018833582

VL - 13

SP - 181

EP - 188

JO - World Neurosurgery

JF - World Neurosurgery

SN - 1878-8750

IS - 3

ER -

von Essen C, Zervas NT, Brown DR, Koltun WA, Pickren KS. Local cerebral blood flow in the dog during intravenous infusion of dopamine. Surgical Neurology. 1980 May 9;13(3):181-188.