Local needs and agency conflict: A case study of Kajo Keji County, Sudan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During Southern Sudan's second period of civil war, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) provided almost all of the region's public services and greatly influenced local administration. Refugee movements, inadequate infrastructures, food shortages, accountability issues, disputes and other difficulties overwhelmed both the agencies and newly developed civil authorities. Blurred distinctions between political and humanitarian activities resulted, as demonstrated in a controversy surrounding a 2004 distribution of relief food in Central Equatoria State. Based on analysis of documents, correspondence and interviews, this case study of Kajo Keji reveals many of the challenges posed by NGO activity in Southern Sudan and other countries emerging from long-term instability. Given recurrent criticisms of NGOs in war-torn areas of Africa, agency operations must be appropriately geared to affected populations and scrutinized by governments, donors, recipients and the media.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-56
Number of pages32
JournalAfrican Studies Quarterly
Volume11
Issue number1
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

Fingerprint

Sudan
food
civil war
public service
refugee
shortage
criticism
recipient
infrastructure
responsibility
interview

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

@article{7e0d3f68e94a40d2b458cc8532841f73,
title = "Local needs and agency conflict: A case study of Kajo Keji County, Sudan",
abstract = "During Southern Sudan's second period of civil war, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) provided almost all of the region's public services and greatly influenced local administration. Refugee movements, inadequate infrastructures, food shortages, accountability issues, disputes and other difficulties overwhelmed both the agencies and newly developed civil authorities. Blurred distinctions between political and humanitarian activities resulted, as demonstrated in a controversy surrounding a 2004 distribution of relief food in Central Equatoria State. Based on analysis of documents, correspondence and interviews, this case study of Kajo Keji reveals many of the challenges posed by NGO activity in Southern Sudan and other countries emerging from long-term instability. Given recurrent criticisms of NGOs in war-torn areas of Africa, agency operations must be appropriately geared to affected populations and scrutinized by governments, donors, recipients and the media.",
author = "Fegley, {Randall Arlin}",
year = "2009",
month = "9",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "25--56",
journal = "African Studies Quarterly",
issn = "1093-2658",
publisher = "University of Florida",
number = "1",

}

Local needs and agency conflict : A case study of Kajo Keji County, Sudan. / Fegley, Randall Arlin.

In: African Studies Quarterly, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.09.2009, p. 25-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Local needs and agency conflict

T2 - A case study of Kajo Keji County, Sudan

AU - Fegley, Randall Arlin

PY - 2009/9/1

Y1 - 2009/9/1

N2 - During Southern Sudan's second period of civil war, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) provided almost all of the region's public services and greatly influenced local administration. Refugee movements, inadequate infrastructures, food shortages, accountability issues, disputes and other difficulties overwhelmed both the agencies and newly developed civil authorities. Blurred distinctions between political and humanitarian activities resulted, as demonstrated in a controversy surrounding a 2004 distribution of relief food in Central Equatoria State. Based on analysis of documents, correspondence and interviews, this case study of Kajo Keji reveals many of the challenges posed by NGO activity in Southern Sudan and other countries emerging from long-term instability. Given recurrent criticisms of NGOs in war-torn areas of Africa, agency operations must be appropriately geared to affected populations and scrutinized by governments, donors, recipients and the media.

AB - During Southern Sudan's second period of civil war, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) provided almost all of the region's public services and greatly influenced local administration. Refugee movements, inadequate infrastructures, food shortages, accountability issues, disputes and other difficulties overwhelmed both the agencies and newly developed civil authorities. Blurred distinctions between political and humanitarian activities resulted, as demonstrated in a controversy surrounding a 2004 distribution of relief food in Central Equatoria State. Based on analysis of documents, correspondence and interviews, this case study of Kajo Keji reveals many of the challenges posed by NGO activity in Southern Sudan and other countries emerging from long-term instability. Given recurrent criticisms of NGOs in war-torn areas of Africa, agency operations must be appropriately geared to affected populations and scrutinized by governments, donors, recipients and the media.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77956444030&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77956444030&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:77956444030

VL - 11

SP - 25

EP - 56

JO - African Studies Quarterly

JF - African Studies Quarterly

SN - 1093-2658

IS - 1

ER -