Locating relationship and communication issues among stressors associated with breast cancer

Kirsten M. Weber, Denise Haunani Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article clarifies how the social contexts in which breast cancer survivors live can contribute to the stress they experience because of the disease. Guided by Solomon and Knobloch's (2004) relational turbulence model and Petronio's (2002) communication privacy management theory, this study explores personal relationship and communication boundary issues within stressors that are associated with the diagnosis, treatment, and early survivorship of breast cancer. A qualitative analysis of discourse posted on breast cancer discussion boards and weblogs using the constant comparative method and open-coding techniques revealed 12 sources of stress. Using axial coding methods and probing these topics for underlying relationship and communication issues yielded 5 themes. The discussion highlights the implications of the findings for the theories that guided this investigation and for breast cancer survivorship more generally.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)548-559
Number of pages12
JournalHealth Communication
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

Fingerprint

cancer
Communication
Breast Neoplasms
communication
coding
Survival Rate
Turbulence models
Privacy
weblog
privacy
Survivors
Disease
discourse
management
experience
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Cite this

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Locating relationship and communication issues among stressors associated with breast cancer. / Weber, Kirsten M.; Solomon, Denise Haunani.

In: Health Communication, Vol. 23, No. 6, 01.11.2008, p. 548-559.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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