Location-specific responses to thermal stress in larvae of the reef-building coral Montastraea faveolata

Nicholas R. Polato, Christian R. Voolstra, Julia Schnetzer, Michael K. DeSalvo, Carly J. Randall, Alina M. Szmant, Mónica Medina, Iliana B. Baums

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The potential to adapt to a changing climate depends in part upon the standing genetic variation present in wild populations. In corals, the dispersive larval phase is particularly vulnerable to the effects of environmental stress. Larval survival and response to stress during dispersal and settlement will play a key role in the persistence of coral populations. Methodology/Principal Findings: To test the hypothesis that larval transcription profiles reflect location-specific responses to thermal stress, symbiont-free gametes from three to four colonies of the scleractinian coral Montastraea faveolata were collected from Florida and Mexico, fertilized, and raised under mean and elevated (up 1 to 2°C above summer mean) temperatures. These locations have been shown to exchange larvae frequently enough to prevent significant differentiation of neutral loci. Differences among 1,310 unigenes were simultaneously characterized using custom cDNA microarrays, allowing investigation of gene expression patterns among larvae generated from wild populations under stress. Results show both conserved and location-specific variation in key processes including apoptosis, cell structuring, adhesion and development, energy and protein metabolism, and response to stress, in embryos of a reef-building coral. Conclusions/Significance: These results provide first insights into location-specific variation in gene expression in the face of gene flow, and support the hypothesis that coral host genomes may house adaptive potential needed to deal with changing environmental conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere11221
JournalPloS one
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 11 2010

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Coral Reefs
Anthozoa
Reefs
thermal stress
Thermal stress
Larva
corals
reefs
Hot Temperature
larvae
Gene expression
stress response
Genes
Population
Gene Expression
gene expression
unigenes
Gene Flow
Cell adhesion
Transcription

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Polato, N. R., Voolstra, C. R., Schnetzer, J., DeSalvo, M. K., Randall, C. J., Szmant, A. M., ... Baums, I. B. (2010). Location-specific responses to thermal stress in larvae of the reef-building coral Montastraea faveolata. PloS one, 5(6), [e11221]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0011221
Polato, Nicholas R. ; Voolstra, Christian R. ; Schnetzer, Julia ; DeSalvo, Michael K. ; Randall, Carly J. ; Szmant, Alina M. ; Medina, Mónica ; Baums, Iliana B. / Location-specific responses to thermal stress in larvae of the reef-building coral Montastraea faveolata. In: PloS one. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 6.
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Location-specific responses to thermal stress in larvae of the reef-building coral Montastraea faveolata. / Polato, Nicholas R.; Voolstra, Christian R.; Schnetzer, Julia; DeSalvo, Michael K.; Randall, Carly J.; Szmant, Alina M.; Medina, Mónica; Baums, Iliana B.

In: PloS one, Vol. 5, No. 6, e11221, 11.08.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Polato NR, Voolstra CR, Schnetzer J, DeSalvo MK, Randall CJ, Szmant AM et al. Location-specific responses to thermal stress in larvae of the reef-building coral Montastraea faveolata. PloS one. 2010 Aug 11;5(6). e11221. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0011221