Long-term effects of early social isolation in Macaca mulatta

changes in dopamine receptor function following apomorphine challenge

Mark H. Lewis, John P. Gluck, Alan J. Beauchamp, Michael F. Keresztury, Richard Mailman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hypothesis that early social isolation results in long-term alterations in dopamine receptor sensitivity was tested using older adult rhesus monkeys. Isolated and control monkeys were challenged with apomorphine (0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg), and the drug effects on spontaneous blink rate, stereotyped behavior, and self-injurious behavior were quantified using observational measures. Monoamine metabolites were quantified from cisternal CSF by HPLC-EC, prior to pharmacological challenge. Isolated and control monkeys did not differ in CSF concentrations of HVA, 5-HIAA, or MHPG. At the higher dose, apomorphine significantly increased the rate of blinking, the occurrence of whole-body stereotypies, and the intensity of stereotyped behavior (as measured by observer ratings) in isolated monkeys. The frequency of occurrence of self-injurious behavior was too low to allow for meaningful comparisons. These significant differences in response to apomorphine challenge support the hypothesis that long-term or permanent alterations in dopamine receptor sensitivity, as assessed by drug challenge, are a consequence of early social deprivation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-73
Number of pages7
JournalBrain research
Volume513
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 9 1990

Fingerprint

Social Isolation
Apomorphine
Dopamine Receptors
Macaca mulatta
Stereotyped Behavior
Haplorhini
Self-Injurious Behavior
Methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol
Blinking
Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid
Pharmaceutical Preparations
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Pharmacology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Lewis, Mark H. ; Gluck, John P. ; Beauchamp, Alan J. ; Keresztury, Michael F. ; Mailman, Richard. / Long-term effects of early social isolation in Macaca mulatta : changes in dopamine receptor function following apomorphine challenge. In: Brain research. 1990 ; Vol. 513, No. 1. pp. 67-73.
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Long-term effects of early social isolation in Macaca mulatta : changes in dopamine receptor function following apomorphine challenge. / Lewis, Mark H.; Gluck, John P.; Beauchamp, Alan J.; Keresztury, Michael F.; Mailman, Richard.

In: Brain research, Vol. 513, No. 1, 09.04.1990, p. 67-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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