Long-term effects of early social isolation in Macaca mulatta: changes in dopamine receptor function following apomorphine challenge

Mark H. Lewis, John P. Gluck, Alan J. Beauchamp, Michael F. Keresztury, Richard B. Mailman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hypothesis that early social isolation results in long-term alterations in dopamine receptor sensitivity was tested using older adult rhesus monkeys. Isolated and control monkeys were challenged with apomorphine (0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg), and the drug effects on spontaneous blink rate, stereotyped behavior, and self-injurious behavior were quantified using observational measures. Monoamine metabolites were quantified from cisternal CSF by HPLC-EC, prior to pharmacological challenge. Isolated and control monkeys did not differ in CSF concentrations of HVA, 5-HIAA, or MHPG. At the higher dose, apomorphine significantly increased the rate of blinking, the occurrence of whole-body stereotypies, and the intensity of stereotyped behavior (as measured by observer ratings) in isolated monkeys. The frequency of occurrence of self-injurious behavior was too low to allow for meaningful comparisons. These significant differences in response to apomorphine challenge support the hypothesis that long-term or permanent alterations in dopamine receptor sensitivity, as assessed by drug challenge, are a consequence of early social deprivation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-73
Number of pages7
JournalBrain research
Volume513
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 9 1990

Fingerprint

Social Isolation
Apomorphine
Dopamine Receptors
Macaca mulatta
Stereotyped Behavior
Haplorhini
Self-Injurious Behavior
Methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol
Blinking
Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid
Pharmaceutical Preparations
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Pharmacology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Lewis, Mark H. ; Gluck, John P. ; Beauchamp, Alan J. ; Keresztury, Michael F. ; Mailman, Richard B. / Long-term effects of early social isolation in Macaca mulatta : changes in dopamine receptor function following apomorphine challenge. In: Brain research. 1990 ; Vol. 513, No. 1. pp. 67-73.
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Long-term effects of early social isolation in Macaca mulatta : changes in dopamine receptor function following apomorphine challenge. / Lewis, Mark H.; Gluck, John P.; Beauchamp, Alan J.; Keresztury, Michael F.; Mailman, Richard B.

In: Brain research, Vol. 513, No. 1, 09.04.1990, p. 67-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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