Long-term effects of imidacloprid on eastern hemlock canopy arthropod biodiversity in New England

Wing Yi Kung, Kelli Hoover, Richard Cowles, R. Talbot Trotter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The systemic insecticide imidacloprid is commonly used to protect trees against attack by the Adelges tsugae (Hemlock Woolly Adelgid [HWA]), an invasive pest that threatens Tsuga canadensis (Eastern Hemlock) and T. caroliniana (Carolina Hemlock) in eastern North America. Although there have been some studies documenting the short-term (1-3 years) impact of imidacloprid on non-target arthropods in hemlock systems, almost nothing is known about the impact over longer time scales. Here, using a set of trees which were experimentally treated 3 and 9 years prior to this study, we found that while the impact of imidacloprid on HWA may be approaching the limits of detection and efficacy on trees treated 9 years ago, there is still an intermittently detectable impact on HWA density. Similarly, 9 years after application there is a subtle but detectable increase in arthropod richness and a shift in canopy-arthropod community composition. Results from the 3-year treated trees were, however, ambiguous, but may be the result of detectable cross-contamination of insecticide among trees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)NENHC40-NENHC55
JournalNortheastern Naturalist
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

Fingerprint

Adelges tsugae
Tsuga canadensis
imidacloprid
New England region
arthropod
long term effects
arthropods
Tsuga caroliniana
canopy
biodiversity
insecticide
insecticides
arthropod communities
cross contamination
community composition
detection limit
pests
timescale
long-term effect

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Kung, Wing Yi ; Hoover, Kelli ; Cowles, Richard ; Trotter, R. Talbot. / Long-term effects of imidacloprid on eastern hemlock canopy arthropod biodiversity in New England. In: Northeastern Naturalist. 2015 ; Vol. 22, No. 1. pp. NENHC40-NENHC55.
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Long-term effects of imidacloprid on eastern hemlock canopy arthropod biodiversity in New England. / Kung, Wing Yi; Hoover, Kelli; Cowles, Richard; Trotter, R. Talbot.

In: Northeastern Naturalist, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.03.2015, p. NENHC40-NENHC55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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