Long-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 associated with fall-related injury in six low- and middle-income countries

Yanfei Guo, Hualiang Lin, Yan Shi, Yang Zheng, Xing Li, Jianpeng Xiao, Tao Liu, Weilin Zeng, Michael G. Vaughn, Lenise A. Cummings-Vaughn, Erik J. Nelson, Zhengmin (Min) Qian, Wenjun Ma, Fan Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exposure to ambient air pollution has been linked with adverse health outcomes of the circulatory and nervous systems. Given that falls are closely related to circulatory and nervous health, we hypothesize that air pollution may adversely affect fall-related injury. We employed Wave 1 data from 36,662 participants aged ≥50 years in WHO's Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health in six low- and middle-income countries. Ambient annual concentration of PM2.5 was estimated using satellite data. A three-level logistic regression model was applied to examine the long-term association between ambient PM2.5 and the prevalence of fall-related injury, and associated disease burden, as well as the potential effect modification of consumption of fruit and vegetables. Ambient PM2.5 was found to be significantly associated with the risk of fall-related injury. Each 10 μg/m3 increase corresponded to 18% (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.28) increase in fall-related injury after adjusting for various covariates. The association was relatively stronger among participants with lower consumption of fruit (OR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.12, 1.33) than higher consumption (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.23), and among those with lower vegetable consumption (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.28) than higher consumption (OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.27). Our study suggests that ambient PM2.5 may be one risk factor for fall-related injury and that higher consumption of fruit and vegetables could alleviate this effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)961-967
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume237
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018

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Vegetables
Fruits
Health
Air pollution
Wounds and Injuries
Fruit
Air Pollution
Neurology
Logistic Models
Logistics
Aging of materials
Satellites
Cardiovascular System
Nervous System

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Guo, Yanfei ; Lin, Hualiang ; Shi, Yan ; Zheng, Yang ; Li, Xing ; Xiao, Jianpeng ; Liu, Tao ; Zeng, Weilin ; Vaughn, Michael G. ; Cummings-Vaughn, Lenise A. ; Nelson, Erik J. ; Qian, Zhengmin (Min) ; Ma, Wenjun ; Wu, Fan. / Long-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 associated with fall-related injury in six low- and middle-income countries. In: Environmental Pollution. 2018 ; Vol. 237. pp. 961-967.
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abstract = "Exposure to ambient air pollution has been linked with adverse health outcomes of the circulatory and nervous systems. Given that falls are closely related to circulatory and nervous health, we hypothesize that air pollution may adversely affect fall-related injury. We employed Wave 1 data from 36,662 participants aged ≥50 years in WHO's Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health in six low- and middle-income countries. Ambient annual concentration of PM2.5 was estimated using satellite data. A three-level logistic regression model was applied to examine the long-term association between ambient PM2.5 and the prevalence of fall-related injury, and associated disease burden, as well as the potential effect modification of consumption of fruit and vegetables. Ambient PM2.5 was found to be significantly associated with the risk of fall-related injury. Each 10 μg/m3 increase corresponded to 18{\%} (OR = 1.18, 95{\%} CI: 1.09, 1.28) increase in fall-related injury after adjusting for various covariates. The association was relatively stronger among participants with lower consumption of fruit (OR = 1.22, 95{\%} CI: 1.12, 1.33) than higher consumption (OR = 1.06, 95{\%} CI: 0.92, 1.23), and among those with lower vegetable consumption (OR = 1.18, 95{\%} CI: 1.08, 1.28) than higher consumption (OR = 1.08, 95{\%} CI: 0.91, 1.27). Our study suggests that ambient PM2.5 may be one risk factor for fall-related injury and that higher consumption of fruit and vegetables could alleviate this effect.",
author = "Yanfei Guo and Hualiang Lin and Yan Shi and Yang Zheng and Xing Li and Jianpeng Xiao and Tao Liu and Weilin Zeng and Vaughn, {Michael G.} and Cummings-Vaughn, {Lenise A.} and Nelson, {Erik J.} and Qian, {Zhengmin (Min)} and Wenjun Ma and Fan Wu",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.envpol.2017.10.134",
language = "English (US)",
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Guo, Y, Lin, H, Shi, Y, Zheng, Y, Li, X, Xiao, J, Liu, T, Zeng, W, Vaughn, MG, Cummings-Vaughn, LA, Nelson, EJ, Qian, ZM, Ma, W & Wu, F 2018, 'Long-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 associated with fall-related injury in six low- and middle-income countries', Environmental Pollution, vol. 237, pp. 961-967. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2017.10.134

Long-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 associated with fall-related injury in six low- and middle-income countries. / Guo, Yanfei; Lin, Hualiang; Shi, Yan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Xing; Xiao, Jianpeng; Liu, Tao; Zeng, Weilin; Vaughn, Michael G.; Cummings-Vaughn, Lenise A.; Nelson, Erik J.; Qian, Zhengmin (Min); Ma, Wenjun; Wu, Fan.

In: Environmental Pollution, Vol. 237, 06.2018, p. 961-967.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term exposure to ambient PM2.5 associated with fall-related injury in six low- and middle-income countries

AU - Guo, Yanfei

AU - Lin, Hualiang

AU - Shi, Yan

AU - Zheng, Yang

AU - Li, Xing

AU - Xiao, Jianpeng

AU - Liu, Tao

AU - Zeng, Weilin

AU - Vaughn, Michael G.

AU - Cummings-Vaughn, Lenise A.

AU - Nelson, Erik J.

AU - Qian, Zhengmin (Min)

AU - Ma, Wenjun

AU - Wu, Fan

PY - 2018/6

Y1 - 2018/6

N2 - Exposure to ambient air pollution has been linked with adverse health outcomes of the circulatory and nervous systems. Given that falls are closely related to circulatory and nervous health, we hypothesize that air pollution may adversely affect fall-related injury. We employed Wave 1 data from 36,662 participants aged ≥50 years in WHO's Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health in six low- and middle-income countries. Ambient annual concentration of PM2.5 was estimated using satellite data. A three-level logistic regression model was applied to examine the long-term association between ambient PM2.5 and the prevalence of fall-related injury, and associated disease burden, as well as the potential effect modification of consumption of fruit and vegetables. Ambient PM2.5 was found to be significantly associated with the risk of fall-related injury. Each 10 μg/m3 increase corresponded to 18% (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.28) increase in fall-related injury after adjusting for various covariates. The association was relatively stronger among participants with lower consumption of fruit (OR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.12, 1.33) than higher consumption (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.23), and among those with lower vegetable consumption (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.28) than higher consumption (OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.27). Our study suggests that ambient PM2.5 may be one risk factor for fall-related injury and that higher consumption of fruit and vegetables could alleviate this effect.

AB - Exposure to ambient air pollution has been linked with adverse health outcomes of the circulatory and nervous systems. Given that falls are closely related to circulatory and nervous health, we hypothesize that air pollution may adversely affect fall-related injury. We employed Wave 1 data from 36,662 participants aged ≥50 years in WHO's Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health in six low- and middle-income countries. Ambient annual concentration of PM2.5 was estimated using satellite data. A three-level logistic regression model was applied to examine the long-term association between ambient PM2.5 and the prevalence of fall-related injury, and associated disease burden, as well as the potential effect modification of consumption of fruit and vegetables. Ambient PM2.5 was found to be significantly associated with the risk of fall-related injury. Each 10 μg/m3 increase corresponded to 18% (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.28) increase in fall-related injury after adjusting for various covariates. The association was relatively stronger among participants with lower consumption of fruit (OR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.12, 1.33) than higher consumption (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.23), and among those with lower vegetable consumption (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.28) than higher consumption (OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.27). Our study suggests that ambient PM2.5 may be one risk factor for fall-related injury and that higher consumption of fruit and vegetables could alleviate this effect.

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