Long-term improvements in oral communication skills and quality of peer relations in children with cochlear implants: Parental testimony

Y. Bat-Chava, Daniela Martin, L. Imperatore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Few research studies have examined longitudinal improvements in oral communication skills and quality of peer relationships of children with implants. Moreover, although the emerging literature suggests that improvement in social functioning follows improvement in oral communication, it is still unknown what factors enhance or impede the relations between these constructs. Methods: Based on parent interviews, the current study examined the long-term improvements in speech and oral language skills and relationships with hearing peers in 19 implanted children. Results: Results demonstrate that on average, children continue to improve in oral communication skills and quality of peer relationships even years after implantation, especially those with initial poorer skills. While oral communication ability and quality of peer relationships are strongly associated at each time point, gains in these two variables are associated only for some of the children. Other factors, including self-confidence and peer acceptance, seem to moderate this relationship. Qualitative data are presented to illustrate these relations among variables and to assist in theory building. Conclusions: The results highlight the need for more specific examination of various developmental periods in combination with the progress of oral communication and peer relationships among children with implants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)870-881
Number of pages12
JournalChild: Care, Health and Development
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Cochlear Implants
Communication
Aptitude
Hearing
Language
Interviews
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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Long-term improvements in oral communication skills and quality of peer relations in children with cochlear implants : Parental testimony. / Bat-Chava, Y.; Martin, Daniela; Imperatore, L.

In: Child: Care, Health and Development, Vol. 40, No. 6, 01.01.2014, p. 870-881.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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