Long-term outcomes for individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication: Part III - Contributing factors

Shelley K. Lund, Janice Catherine Light

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to improve outcomes for individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), it is important to understand what factors contribute to or detract from positive outcomes. Seven young men who had used AAC systems for at least 15 years, their family members, and professionals who had worked with them, participated in the study. Qualitative interviews were used to identify contextual factors that may have contributed (both positively and negatively) to the young men's outcomes. Factors that impeded positive outcomes included: attitude barriers, cultural differences, technological barriers, and service delivery limitations. Contributions to positive outcomes included: community support, parent and family support, personal characteristics, and appropriate and high-quality AAC services. The results are discussed with implications for clinical practice and directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-335
Number of pages13
JournalAAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Fingerprint

Communication
Interviews
Direction compound

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

@article{b29606f6de7441f4a04b47d999a678e5,
title = "Long-term outcomes for individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication: Part III - Contributing factors",
abstract = "In order to improve outcomes for individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), it is important to understand what factors contribute to or detract from positive outcomes. Seven young men who had used AAC systems for at least 15 years, their family members, and professionals who had worked with them, participated in the study. Qualitative interviews were used to identify contextual factors that may have contributed (both positively and negatively) to the young men's outcomes. Factors that impeded positive outcomes included: attitude barriers, cultural differences, technological barriers, and service delivery limitations. Contributions to positive outcomes included: community support, parent and family support, personal characteristics, and appropriate and high-quality AAC services. The results are discussed with implications for clinical practice and directions for future research.",
author = "Lund, {Shelley K.} and Light, {Janice Catherine}",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/02656730701189123",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "323--335",
journal = "AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication",
issn = "0743-4618",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term outcomes for individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication

T2 - Part III - Contributing factors

AU - Lund, Shelley K.

AU - Light, Janice Catherine

PY - 2007/12/1

Y1 - 2007/12/1

N2 - In order to improve outcomes for individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), it is important to understand what factors contribute to or detract from positive outcomes. Seven young men who had used AAC systems for at least 15 years, their family members, and professionals who had worked with them, participated in the study. Qualitative interviews were used to identify contextual factors that may have contributed (both positively and negatively) to the young men's outcomes. Factors that impeded positive outcomes included: attitude barriers, cultural differences, technological barriers, and service delivery limitations. Contributions to positive outcomes included: community support, parent and family support, personal characteristics, and appropriate and high-quality AAC services. The results are discussed with implications for clinical practice and directions for future research.

AB - In order to improve outcomes for individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), it is important to understand what factors contribute to or detract from positive outcomes. Seven young men who had used AAC systems for at least 15 years, their family members, and professionals who had worked with them, participated in the study. Qualitative interviews were used to identify contextual factors that may have contributed (both positively and negatively) to the young men's outcomes. Factors that impeded positive outcomes included: attitude barriers, cultural differences, technological barriers, and service delivery limitations. Contributions to positive outcomes included: community support, parent and family support, personal characteristics, and appropriate and high-quality AAC services. The results are discussed with implications for clinical practice and directions for future research.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=36248933682&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=36248933682&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02656730701189123

DO - 10.1080/02656730701189123

M3 - Article

C2 - 17852054

AN - SCOPUS:36248933682

VL - 23

SP - 323

EP - 335

JO - AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication

JF - AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication

SN - 0743-4618

IS - 4

ER -