Longitudinal assessment of food intake, fecal energy loss, and energy expenditure after roux-en-y gastric bypass surgery in high-fat-fed obese rats

Andrew C. Shin, Huiyuan Zheng, R. Leigh Townsend, Laurel M. Patterson, Gregory Holmes, Hans Rudolf Berthoud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The efficacy of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery to produce weight loss has been well-documented, but few studies have measured the key components of energy balance, food intake, and energy expenditure longitudinally. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats on a high-fat diet underwent either RYGB, sham operation, or pair feeding and were compared to chow-fed lean controls. Body weight and composition, food intake and preference, energy expenditure, fecal output, and gastric emptying were monitored before and up to 4 months after intervention. Results: Despite the recovery of initially decreased food intake to levels slightly higher than before surgery and comparable to sham-operated rats after about 1 month, RYGB rats maintained a lower level of body weight and fat mass for 4 months that was not different from chow-fed age-matched controls. Energy expenditure corrected for lean body mass at 1 and 4 months after RYGB was not different from presurgical levels and from all other groups. Fecal energy loss was significantly increased at 6 and 16 weeks after RYGB compared to sham operation, and there was a progressive decrease in fat preference after RYGB. Conclusions: In this rat model of RYGB, sustained weight loss is achieved by a combination of initial hypophagia and sustained increases in fecal energy loss, without change in energy expenditure per lean mass. A shift away from high-fat towards low-fat/high-carbohydrate food preference occurring in parallel suggests long-term adaptive mechanisms related to fat absorption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)531-540
Number of pages10
JournalObesity Surgery
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

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Gastric Bypass
Energy Metabolism
Eating
Fats
Food Preferences
Weight Loss
Body Weight
Gastric Emptying
High Fat Diet
Body Composition
Sprague Dawley Rats
Adipose Tissue
Carbohydrates

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Shin, Andrew C. ; Zheng, Huiyuan ; Townsend, R. Leigh ; Patterson, Laurel M. ; Holmes, Gregory ; Berthoud, Hans Rudolf. / Longitudinal assessment of food intake, fecal energy loss, and energy expenditure after roux-en-y gastric bypass surgery in high-fat-fed obese rats. In: Obesity Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 23, No. 4. pp. 531-540.
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Longitudinal assessment of food intake, fecal energy loss, and energy expenditure after roux-en-y gastric bypass surgery in high-fat-fed obese rats. / Shin, Andrew C.; Zheng, Huiyuan; Townsend, R. Leigh; Patterson, Laurel M.; Holmes, Gregory; Berthoud, Hans Rudolf.

In: Obesity Surgery, Vol. 23, No. 4, 01.04.2013, p. 531-540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Shin, Andrew C.

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