Longitudinal improvements in communication and socialization of deaf children with cochlear implants and hearing aids: evidence from parental reports.

Yael Bat-Chava, Daniela Martin, Joseph G. Kosciw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

93 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Research has shown that the cochlear implant may improve deaf children's speech and communication skills. However, little is known about its effect on children's ability to socialize with hearing peers. METHODS: Using a standardized psychological measure completed by parents and a longitudinal design, this study examined the development of communication, socialization, and daily living skills of children who used hearing aids or cochlear implants for an average of 11 and 6 years, respectively. RESULTS: Results show that children with cochlear implants, who were more delayed than children with hearing aids at the outset, made significant progress over time. Children with both devices achieved age-appropriate development after years of hearing aid or cochlear implant use. CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of results suggests that cochlear implants may be effective in improving deaf children's communication and social skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1287-1296
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines
Volume46
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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