Longitudinal Pathways From Marital Hostility to Child Anger During Toddlerhood

Genetic Susceptibility and Indirect Effects via Harsh Parenting

Kimberly A. Rhoades, Leslie D. Leve, Gordon T. Harold, Jenae Marie Neiderhiser, Daniel S. Shaw, David Reiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined direct and indirect pathways from marital hostility to toddler anger/frustration via harsh parenting and parental depressive symptoms, with an additional focus on the moderating role of genetic influences as inferred from birth parent anger/frustration. Participants were 361 linked triads of birth mothers, adoptive parents, and adopted children who were 9 (T1) and 18 (T2) months old across the study period. Results indicated an indirect effect from T1 marital hostility to T2 toddler anger/frustration via T2 parental harsh discipline. Results also indicated that the association between marital hostility and toddler anger was moderated by birth mother anger/frustration. For children whose birth mothers reported high levels of anger/frustration, adoptive parents' marital hostility at T1 predicted toddler anger/frustration at T2. This relation did not hold for children whose birth mothers reported low levels of anger/frustration. The results suggest that children whose birth mothers report elevated frustration might inherit an emotional lability that makes them more sensitive to the effects of marital hostility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)282-291
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

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Frustration
Hostility
Parenting
Anger
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Parturition
Mothers
Parents
Depression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Rhoades, Kimberly A. ; Leve, Leslie D. ; Harold, Gordon T. ; Neiderhiser, Jenae Marie ; Shaw, Daniel S. ; Reiss, David. / Longitudinal Pathways From Marital Hostility to Child Anger During Toddlerhood : Genetic Susceptibility and Indirect Effects via Harsh Parenting. In: Journal of Family Psychology. 2011 ; Vol. 25, No. 2. pp. 282-291.
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Longitudinal Pathways From Marital Hostility to Child Anger During Toddlerhood : Genetic Susceptibility and Indirect Effects via Harsh Parenting. / Rhoades, Kimberly A.; Leve, Leslie D.; Harold, Gordon T.; Neiderhiser, Jenae Marie; Shaw, Daniel S.; Reiss, David.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.04.2011, p. 282-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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