Looking inside the skyscraper: size and occupancy of Toronto office buildings, 1890-1950.

G. Gad, D. W. Holdsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the emergence of skyscrapers as a distinctive element in the downtown fabric symbolizes economic change and progress, research questions surrounding their appearance need to go beyond merely noting their height and facade detail. Using studies in Toronto, Ontario, this paper investigates more useful measures such as floorspace, tenancies, and employment levels that have been calculated for several generations of office buildings. The possibilities and limitations of fire insurance atlases, assessment rolls, street directories, and company records are examined. The case studies suggest the interrelatedness of forces at work in shaping office-district landscapes.-Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-189
Number of pages14
JournalUrban History Review
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

Fingerprint

building
directory
city center
economic change
atlas
insurance
district
economics
office
Insurance
Record Companies
Façade
Ontario
Directory
Skyscrapers
Atlas
Economic Development
Economic Change
fabric

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

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Looking inside the skyscraper : size and occupancy of Toronto office buildings, 1890-1950. / Gad, G.; Holdsworth, D. W.

In: Urban History Review, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.01.1987, p. 176-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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