Lost sleep and cyberloafing: Evidence from the laboratory and a daylight saving time quasi-experiment

David T. Wagner, Christopher M. Barnes, Vivien K.G. Lim, D. Lance Ferris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

118 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Internet is a powerful tool that has changed the way people work. However, the ubiquity of the Internet has led to a new workplace threat to productivity-cyberloafing. Building on the ego depletion model of self-regulation, we examine how lost and low-quality sleep influence employee cyberloafing behaviors and how individual differences in conscientiousness moderate these effects. We also demonstrate that the shift to Daylight Saving Time (DST) results in a dramatic increase in cyberloafing behavior at the national level. We first tested the DST-cyberloafing relation through a national quasi-experiment, then directly tested the relation between sleep and cyberloafing in a closely controlled laboratory setting. We discuss the implications of our findings for theory, practice, and future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1068-1076
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume97
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

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