Low fat ice cream

Arun Kilara

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses the ingredients, processes and storage of ice cream and their impact on texture. The main components in an ice cream mix are fat, milk solids but not fat, sweeteners and stabilizers and emulsifiers. Low fat ice cream differs from regular ice cream in the total fat content. In low fat ice cream the fat content of the mix is between 3-4%, that is, the volume fraction of fat is lower than regular ice cream. If the mix is not formulated to compensate for the lower fat content, the total solids of the mix will be low and management of more water through the freezing, storage and distribution can pose problems of texture deterioration. The role of temperature during storage, transportation and distribution is another critical factor in determining texture of ice cream and frozen desserts. Minimizing temperature fluctuations helps prolong the textural attributes of ice cream.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFood Texture Design and Optimization
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages74-92
Number of pages19
Volume9780470672426
ISBN (Electronic)9781118765616
ISBN (Print)9780470672426
DOIs
StatePublished - May 27 2014

Fingerprint

low fat ice cream
Ice Cream
ice cream
Oils and fats
Ice
Fats
texture
lipid content
Textures
frozen desserts
sweeteners
emulsifiers
frozen storage
total solids
lipids
Sweetening Agents
water management
storage temperature
milk fat
Temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Kilara, A. (2014). Low fat ice cream. In Food Texture Design and Optimization (Vol. 9780470672426, pp. 74-92). Wiley-Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118765616.ch4
Kilara, Arun. / Low fat ice cream. Food Texture Design and Optimization. Vol. 9780470672426 Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. pp. 74-92
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Kilara, A 2014, Low fat ice cream. in Food Texture Design and Optimization. vol. 9780470672426, Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 74-92. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118765616.ch4

Low fat ice cream. / Kilara, Arun.

Food Texture Design and Optimization. Vol. 9780470672426 Wiley-Blackwell, 2014. p. 74-92.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Kilara A. Low fat ice cream. In Food Texture Design and Optimization. Vol. 9780470672426. Wiley-Blackwell. 2014. p. 74-92 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118765616.ch4