Low-Temperature Ionic Conductivity of an Acceptor-Doped Perovskite: I. Impedance of Single-Crystal SrTiO3

Russell A. Maier, Clive A. Randall, J. Stevenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Low-temperature conductivity mechanisms were identified in acceptor-doped SrTiO3 single crystals quenched from high temperatures under reducing conditions. Impedance spectroscopy measurements made on samples of the prototypical perovskite structure doped with iron provided a framework for creating a complete conductivity model for a well-defined point defect system. The dominant conductivity mechanism in the room-temperature range was identified as being controlled by oxygen vacancy hopping. The activation energy for oxygen vacancy migration, an often debated value in the perovskite community, is determined to lie within the range of 0.59–0.78 eV for the iron-doped system with the bottom of this range approaching the intrinsic value for oxygen vacancy hopping in an undoped single crystal. At low temperatures, oxygen vacancies form defect complexes with iron impurities, and the observed range of activation energies is explained and modeled in terms of an oxygen vacancy trapping mechanism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3350-3359
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the American Ceramic Society
Volume99
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

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Oxygen vacancies
Ionic conductivity
Perovskite
Single crystals
Iron
Temperature
Activation energy
Point defects
strontium titanium oxide
perovskite
Spectroscopy
Impurities
Defects

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

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Low-Temperature Ionic Conductivity of an Acceptor-Doped Perovskite : I. Impedance of Single-Crystal SrTiO3. / Maier, Russell A.; Randall, Clive A.; Stevenson, J.

In: Journal of the American Ceramic Society, Vol. 99, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 3350-3359.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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