Low temperature viscoelasticity in nanocrystalline nickel films

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Metals typically do not exhibit viscoelastic deformation. However, grain size effects can render grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals viscous. Modeling the nanocrystallites as linear elastic elements embedded in a viscous network of grain boundaries, the overall response of nanocrystalline metals can be viscoelastic even at lower temperatures. To investigate this hypothesis, we measured viscoelastic response of 100 nm thick freestanding nickel films at temperatures up to 425 K. Experimental results show about two orders of magnitude lower viscosity compared to the bulk, suggesting that diffusion enhanced mobility of grain boundary atoms may be responsible for such pronounced viscoelasticity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-61
Number of pages3
JournalMaterials Letters
Volume118
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014

Fingerprint

viscoelasticity
Viscoelasticity
Nickel
Grain boundaries
grain boundaries
Metals
nickel
metals
Nanocrystallites
Chemical elements
Temperature
grain size
Viscosity
viscosity
Atoms
atoms
temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "Metals typically do not exhibit viscoelastic deformation. However, grain size effects can render grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals viscous. Modeling the nanocrystallites as linear elastic elements embedded in a viscous network of grain boundaries, the overall response of nanocrystalline metals can be viscoelastic even at lower temperatures. To investigate this hypothesis, we measured viscoelastic response of 100 nm thick freestanding nickel films at temperatures up to 425 K. Experimental results show about two orders of magnitude lower viscosity compared to the bulk, suggesting that diffusion enhanced mobility of grain boundary atoms may be responsible for such pronounced viscoelasticity.",
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Low temperature viscoelasticity in nanocrystalline nickel films. / Wang, B.; Haque, Md Amanul.

In: Materials Letters, Vol. 118, 01.03.2014, p. 59-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Metals typically do not exhibit viscoelastic deformation. However, grain size effects can render grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals viscous. Modeling the nanocrystallites as linear elastic elements embedded in a viscous network of grain boundaries, the overall response of nanocrystalline metals can be viscoelastic even at lower temperatures. To investigate this hypothesis, we measured viscoelastic response of 100 nm thick freestanding nickel films at temperatures up to 425 K. Experimental results show about two orders of magnitude lower viscosity compared to the bulk, suggesting that diffusion enhanced mobility of grain boundary atoms may be responsible for such pronounced viscoelasticity.

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