Lygus lineolaris (Heteroptera: Miridae) population dynamics: nymphal development, life tables, and Leslie matrices on selected weeds and cotton

Shelby Jay Fleischer, M. J. Gaylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Linear models for total or stage-specific nymphal development were not different among 9 weed hosts and cotton; they extrapolate to a lower threshold of c10°C. A truncated normal model from green beans resulted in an upper threshold of c34°C and a curve breadth that suggests a temperature-generalist life strategy. Percentage of time per instar was influenced by the host. Nymphal survivorship was high on weed hosts but poor on cotton Gossypium hirsutum. The sex ratio was 1:1 and was not influenced by host. Adult survivorship and total fecundity was higher on cotton than Erigeron annuus, but the net fecundity was higher on the weed. More eggs were deposited in cotton buds than other parts of the cotton plant except the terminal. Birth rates were similar on E. annuus and cotton, but cohorts on cotton had a higher death rate and longer generation time. The intrinsic rate of increase on cotton was about half that on E. annuus. The stable-stage distribution was unaffected by host and was about 0.50, 0.40, and 0.10 for eggs, nymphs, and adults, respectively. Host influenced the time of convergence. Analyses suggest an r-selected life strategy. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-253
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Entomology
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

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Lygus lineolaris
life table
Miridae
life tables
Heteroptera
weed
cotton
population dynamics
weeds
matrix
Erigeron annuus
weed hosts
survivorship
fecundity
survival rate
egg
birth rate
generation time
green beans
Gossypium hirsutum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Insect Science

Cite this

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N2 - Linear models for total or stage-specific nymphal development were not different among 9 weed hosts and cotton; they extrapolate to a lower threshold of c10°C. A truncated normal model from green beans resulted in an upper threshold of c34°C and a curve breadth that suggests a temperature-generalist life strategy. Percentage of time per instar was influenced by the host. Nymphal survivorship was high on weed hosts but poor on cotton Gossypium hirsutum. The sex ratio was 1:1 and was not influenced by host. Adult survivorship and total fecundity was higher on cotton than Erigeron annuus, but the net fecundity was higher on the weed. More eggs were deposited in cotton buds than other parts of the cotton plant except the terminal. Birth rates were similar on E. annuus and cotton, but cohorts on cotton had a higher death rate and longer generation time. The intrinsic rate of increase on cotton was about half that on E. annuus. The stable-stage distribution was unaffected by host and was about 0.50, 0.40, and 0.10 for eggs, nymphs, and adults, respectively. Host influenced the time of convergence. Analyses suggest an r-selected life strategy. -from Authors

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