Machine learning classification of medication adherence in patients with movement disorders using non-wearable sensors

Conrad S. Tucker, Ishan Behoora, Harriet Black Nembhard, Mechelle Lewis, Nicholas W. Sterling, Xuemei Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Medication non-adherence is a major concern in the healthcare industry and has led to increases in health risks and medical costs. For many neurological diseases, adherence to medication regimens can be assessed by observing movement patterns. However, physician observations are typically assessed based on visual inspection of movement and are limited to clinical testing procedures. Consequently, medication adherence is difficult to measure when patients are away from the clinical setting. The authors propose a data mining driven methodology that uses low cost, non-wearable multimodal sensors to model and predict patients' adherence to medication protocols, based on variations in their gait. The authors conduct a study involving Parkinson's disease patients that are "on" and "off" their medication in order to determine the statistical validity of the methodology. The data acquired can then be used to quantify patients' adherence while away from the clinic. Accordingly, this data-driven system may allow for early warnings regarding patient safety. Using whole-body movement data readings from the patients, the authors were able to discriminate between PD patients on and off medication, with accuracies greater than 97% for some patients using an individually customized model and accuracies of 78% for a generalized model containing multiple patient gait data. The proposed methodology and study demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of using low cost, non-wearable hardware and data mining models to monitor medication adherence outside of the traditional healthcare facility. These innovations may allow for cost effective, remote monitoring of treatment of neurological diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-134
Number of pages15
JournalComputers in Biology and Medicine
Volume66
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Health Informatics

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