Magma-sponge hypothesis and stratovolcanoes: Case for a compressible reservoir and quasi-steady deep influx at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat

Barry Voight, Christina Widiwijayanti, Glen Mattioli, Derek Elsworth, Dannie Hidayat, M. Strutt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We use well-documented time histories of episodic GPS surface deformation and efflux of compressible magma to resolve apparent magma budget anomalies at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) on Montserrat, WI. We focus on data from 2003 to 2007, for an inflation succeeded by an episode of eruption-plus- deflation. We examine Mogi-type and vertical prolate ellipsoidal chamber geometries to accommodate both mineralogical constraints indicating a relatively shallow pre-eruption storage, and geodetic constraints inferring a deeper mean-pressure source. An exsolved phase involving several gas species greatly increases andesite magma compressibility to depths >10 km (i.e., for water content >4 wt%, crystallinity ∼40%), and this property supports the concept that much of the magma transferred into or out of the crustal reservoir could be accommodated by compression or decompression of stored reservoir magma (i.e., the "magma-sponge"). Our results suggest quasi-steady deep, mainly mafic magma influx of the order of 2 m3s-1, and we conclude that magma released in eruptive episodes is approximately balanced by cumulative deep influx during the eruptive episode and the preceding inflation. Our magma-sponge model predicts that between 2003 and 2007 there was no evident depletion of magma reservoir volume at SHV, which comprises tens of km 3 with radial dimensions of order ∼1-2 km, in turn implying a long-lived eruption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberL00E05
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

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stratovolcano
sponge
volcanoes
magma
volcano
volcanic eruption
volcanic eruptions
inflation
magma chamber
deflation
efflux
crystallinity
decompression
compressibility
andesite
pressure reduction
GPS
budgets
water content
compression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

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title = "Magma-sponge hypothesis and stratovolcanoes: Case for a compressible reservoir and quasi-steady deep influx at Soufri{\`e}re Hills Volcano, Montserrat",
abstract = "We use well-documented time histories of episodic GPS surface deformation and efflux of compressible magma to resolve apparent magma budget anomalies at Soufri{\`e}re Hills volcano (SHV) on Montserrat, WI. We focus on data from 2003 to 2007, for an inflation succeeded by an episode of eruption-plus- deflation. We examine Mogi-type and vertical prolate ellipsoidal chamber geometries to accommodate both mineralogical constraints indicating a relatively shallow pre-eruption storage, and geodetic constraints inferring a deeper mean-pressure source. An exsolved phase involving several gas species greatly increases andesite magma compressibility to depths >10 km (i.e., for water content >4 wt{\%}, crystallinity ∼40{\%}), and this property supports the concept that much of the magma transferred into or out of the crustal reservoir could be accommodated by compression or decompression of stored reservoir magma (i.e., the {"}magma-sponge{"}). Our results suggest quasi-steady deep, mainly mafic magma influx of the order of 2 m3s-1, and we conclude that magma released in eruptive episodes is approximately balanced by cumulative deep influx during the eruptive episode and the preceding inflation. Our magma-sponge model predicts that between 2003 and 2007 there was no evident depletion of magma reservoir volume at SHV, which comprises tens of km 3 with radial dimensions of order ∼1-2 km, in turn implying a long-lived eruption.",
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Magma-sponge hypothesis and stratovolcanoes : Case for a compressible reservoir and quasi-steady deep influx at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat. / Voight, Barry; Widiwijayanti, Christina; Mattioli, Glen; Elsworth, Derek; Hidayat, Dannie; Strutt, M.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 37, No. 4, L00E05, 01.02.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

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T2 - Case for a compressible reservoir and quasi-steady deep influx at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat

AU - Voight, Barry

AU - Widiwijayanti, Christina

AU - Mattioli, Glen

AU - Elsworth, Derek

AU - Hidayat, Dannie

AU - Strutt, M.

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AB - We use well-documented time histories of episodic GPS surface deformation and efflux of compressible magma to resolve apparent magma budget anomalies at Soufrière Hills volcano (SHV) on Montserrat, WI. We focus on data from 2003 to 2007, for an inflation succeeded by an episode of eruption-plus- deflation. We examine Mogi-type and vertical prolate ellipsoidal chamber geometries to accommodate both mineralogical constraints indicating a relatively shallow pre-eruption storage, and geodetic constraints inferring a deeper mean-pressure source. An exsolved phase involving several gas species greatly increases andesite magma compressibility to depths >10 km (i.e., for water content >4 wt%, crystallinity ∼40%), and this property supports the concept that much of the magma transferred into or out of the crustal reservoir could be accommodated by compression or decompression of stored reservoir magma (i.e., the "magma-sponge"). Our results suggest quasi-steady deep, mainly mafic magma influx of the order of 2 m3s-1, and we conclude that magma released in eruptive episodes is approximately balanced by cumulative deep influx during the eruptive episode and the preceding inflation. Our magma-sponge model predicts that between 2003 and 2007 there was no evident depletion of magma reservoir volume at SHV, which comprises tens of km 3 with radial dimensions of order ∼1-2 km, in turn implying a long-lived eruption.

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