Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia for treating locally advanced unresectable and borderline resectable pancreatic cancers: the role of tumor size and eddy-current heating

Anilchandra Attaluri, Sri Kamal Kandala, Haoming Zhou, Michele Wabler, Theodore L. DeWeese, Robert Ivkov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Tumor volume largely determines the success of local control of borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer with current therapy. We hypothesized that a tumor-mass normalized dose of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (MNPH) with alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) reduces the effect of tumor volume for treatment. Methods: 18 female athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneous MiaPaCa02 human xenograft tumors were treated with MNPH following intratumor injections of 5.5 mg Fe/g tumor of an aqueous suspension of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles. Mice were randomly divided into control (n = 5) and treated groups having small (0.15 ± 0.03 cm3, n = 4) or large (0.30 ± 0.06 cm3, n = 5) tumors. We assessed the clinical feasibility of this approach and of pulsed AMF to minimize eddy current heating using a finite-element method to solve a bioheat equation for a human-scale multilayer model. Results: Compared to the control group, both small and large MiaPaCa02 subcutaneous tumors showed statistically significant growth inhibition. Conversely, there was no significant difference in tumor growth between large and small tumors. Both computational and xenograft models demonstrated higher maximum tumor temperatures for large tumors compared to small tumors. Computational modeling demonstrates that pulsed AMF can minimize nonspecific eddy current heating. Conclusions: MNPH provides an advantage to treat large tumors because the MION dose can be adjusted to increase power. Pulsed AMF, with adjusted treatment time, can enhance MNPH in challenging cases such as low MION dose in the target tissue and/or large patients by minimizing nonspecific eddy current heating without sacrificing thermal dose to the target. Nanoparticle heterogeneity in tumors remains a challenge for continued research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108-119
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Hyperthermia
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Cancer Research

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