Male Scientists’ Competing Devotions to Work and Family: Changing Norms in a Male-Dominated Profession

Sarah Damaske, Elaine Howard Ecklund, Anne E. Lincoln, Virginia J. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using in-depth interviews with 74 men across different ranks in biology and physics at prestigious U.S. universities, the authors ask to what extent changing norms of fatherhood and a flexible workplace affect men working in a highly male-dominated profession and what variation exists in family forms. The authors conceptualize four typologies of men: those forgoing children, egalitarian partners, neotraditional dual earners, and traditional breadwinners. Findings suggest male scientists hold strong work devotions, yet a growing number seek egalitarian relationships, which they frame as reducing their devotion to work. The majority of men find the all-consuming nature of academic science conflicts with changing fatherhood norms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-507
Number of pages31
JournalWork and Occupations
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 11 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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