Mammalian gut immunity

Benoit Chassaing, Manish Kumar, Mark T. Baker, Vishal Singh, Matam Vijay-Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells) and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells) origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a "love-hate relationship." Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-258
Number of pages13
JournalBiomedical Journal
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

Fingerprint

Microbiota
Immune System
Immunity
Homeostasis
Hate
Dysbiosis
Paneth Cells
Goblet Cells
Love
Metabolic Diseases
Biomass
Dendritic Cells
Ecosystem
Epithelium
Macrophages
Inflammation
T-Lymphocytes
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Chassaing, B., Kumar, M., Baker, M. T., Singh, V., & Vijay-Kumar, M. (2014). Mammalian gut immunity. Biomedical Journal, 37(5), 246-258. https://doi.org/10.4103/2319-4170.130922
Chassaing, Benoit ; Kumar, Manish ; Baker, Mark T. ; Singh, Vishal ; Vijay-Kumar, Matam. / Mammalian gut immunity. In: Biomedical Journal. 2014 ; Vol. 37, No. 5. pp. 246-258.
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Chassaing, B, Kumar, M, Baker, MT, Singh, V & Vijay-Kumar, M 2014, 'Mammalian gut immunity', Biomedical Journal, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. 246-258. https://doi.org/10.4103/2319-4170.130922

Mammalian gut immunity. / Chassaing, Benoit; Kumar, Manish; Baker, Mark T.; Singh, Vishal; Vijay-Kumar, Matam.

In: Biomedical Journal, Vol. 37, No. 5, 01.09.2014, p. 246-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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Chassaing B, Kumar M, Baker MT, Singh V, Vijay-Kumar M. Mammalian gut immunity. Biomedical Journal. 2014 Sep 1;37(5):246-258. https://doi.org/10.4103/2319-4170.130922