Management of osteoarthritis of the knee in the active patient

Brian T. Feeley, Robert A. Gallo, Seth Sherman, Riley J. Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Total knee arthroplasty has been extremely successful in elderly patients with osteoarthritis. However, there is considerable controversy regarding how best to treat the younger, athletic patient with advanced arthritis. Treatment options range from nonsurgical management with exercise and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, to joint arthroplasty with activity modification. When properly indicated, arthroscopic debridement, high tibial osteotomy, unicondylar knee arthroplasty, and total knee arthroplasty allow younger patients with arthritis to maintain an active, healthy lifestyle.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)406-416
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Volume18
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

Fingerprint

Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Knee Osteoarthritis
Arthritis
Debridement
Osteotomy
Osteoarthritis
Arthroplasty
Sports
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Joints
Exercise
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Feeley, Brian T. ; Gallo, Robert A. ; Sherman, Seth ; Williams, Riley J. / Management of osteoarthritis of the knee in the active patient. In: Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2010 ; Vol. 18, No. 7. pp. 406-416.
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Management of osteoarthritis of the knee in the active patient. / Feeley, Brian T.; Gallo, Robert A.; Sherman, Seth; Williams, Riley J.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Vol. 18, No. 7, 07.2010, p. 406-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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