Management of ruptured brain arteriovenous malformations

Brad Zacharia, Kerry A. Vaughan, Adam Jacoby, Zachary L. Hickman, Daniel Bodmer, E. Sander Connolly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are a common cause of stroke in younger patients, and often present as intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH), associated with 10 % to 30 % mortality. Patients who present with a hemorrhage from an AVM should be initially stabilized according to acute management guidelines for ICH. The characteristics of a lesion including its size, location in eloquent tissue, and high-risk features will influence risk of rupture, prognosis, as well as help guide management decisions. Given that rupture is associated with an increased risk of 6 % re-rupture in the year following the initial hemorrhage, versus 1 % to 3 % predicted annual risk in non-ruptured lesions only, definitive treatment is encouraged after ICH stabilization. A rest period of 2 to 6 weeks after hemorrhage is recommended before definitive treatment to avoid disrupting friable parenchyma and the hematoma. Treatment may consist of endovascular embolization, surgical resection, radiosurgery, or a combination of these three interventions based on the lesion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-342
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent atherosclerosis reports
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

Fingerprint

Arteriovenous Malformations
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Rupture
Brain
Hemorrhage
Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations
Radiosurgery
Hematoma
Therapeutics
Stroke
Guidelines
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Zacharia, B., Vaughan, K. A., Jacoby, A., Hickman, Z. L., Bodmer, D., & Connolly, E. S. (2012). Management of ruptured brain arteriovenous malformations. Current atherosclerosis reports, 14(4), 335-342. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11883-012-0257-9
Zacharia, Brad ; Vaughan, Kerry A. ; Jacoby, Adam ; Hickman, Zachary L. ; Bodmer, Daniel ; Connolly, E. Sander. / Management of ruptured brain arteriovenous malformations. In: Current atherosclerosis reports. 2012 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 335-342.
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Zacharia, B, Vaughan, KA, Jacoby, A, Hickman, ZL, Bodmer, D & Connolly, ES 2012, 'Management of ruptured brain arteriovenous malformations', Current atherosclerosis reports, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 335-342. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11883-012-0257-9

Management of ruptured brain arteriovenous malformations. / Zacharia, Brad; Vaughan, Kerry A.; Jacoby, Adam; Hickman, Zachary L.; Bodmer, Daniel; Connolly, E. Sander.

In: Current atherosclerosis reports, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.08.2012, p. 335-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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