Management of thyroid nodules

S. F. Rifat, Mack Ruffin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinically apparent thyroid nodules occur in about 5 percent of the population. Because most patients with thyroid nodules present initially to their primary care physician, family physicians should have a thorough understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid nodules. The history and physical examination may be helpful in detecting thyroid nodules but are not useful in predicting malignancy. Furthermore, laboratory studies, ultrasonography and nuclear medicine scans do not reliably differentiate between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. In most cases, fine-needle aspiration biopsy can accurately identify malignant thyroid nodules. Fine- needle aspiration biopsy is safe and can be performed in an office setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)785-790
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume50
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Thyroid Nodule
Fine Needle Biopsy
Nuclear Medicine
Family Physicians
Primary Care Physicians
Physical Examination
Ultrasonography
History
Population
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Rifat, S. F. ; Ruffin, Mack. / Management of thyroid nodules. In: American Family Physician. 1994 ; Vol. 50, No. 4. pp. 785-790.
@article{99ffccc549284c32bd75c1f4cbe30ebb,
title = "Management of thyroid nodules",
abstract = "Clinically apparent thyroid nodules occur in about 5 percent of the population. Because most patients with thyroid nodules present initially to their primary care physician, family physicians should have a thorough understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid nodules. The history and physical examination may be helpful in detecting thyroid nodules but are not useful in predicting malignancy. Furthermore, laboratory studies, ultrasonography and nuclear medicine scans do not reliably differentiate between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. In most cases, fine-needle aspiration biopsy can accurately identify malignant thyroid nodules. Fine- needle aspiration biopsy is safe and can be performed in an office setting.",
author = "Rifat, {S. F.} and Mack Ruffin",
year = "1994",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "785--790",
journal = "American Family Physician",
issn = "0002-838X",
publisher = "American Academy of Family Physicians",
number = "4",

}

Rifat, SF & Ruffin, M 1994, 'Management of thyroid nodules', American Family Physician, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 785-790.

Management of thyroid nodules. / Rifat, S. F.; Ruffin, Mack.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 50, No. 4, 1994, p. 785-790.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Management of thyroid nodules

AU - Rifat, S. F.

AU - Ruffin, Mack

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Clinically apparent thyroid nodules occur in about 5 percent of the population. Because most patients with thyroid nodules present initially to their primary care physician, family physicians should have a thorough understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid nodules. The history and physical examination may be helpful in detecting thyroid nodules but are not useful in predicting malignancy. Furthermore, laboratory studies, ultrasonography and nuclear medicine scans do not reliably differentiate between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. In most cases, fine-needle aspiration biopsy can accurately identify malignant thyroid nodules. Fine- needle aspiration biopsy is safe and can be performed in an office setting.

AB - Clinically apparent thyroid nodules occur in about 5 percent of the population. Because most patients with thyroid nodules present initially to their primary care physician, family physicians should have a thorough understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid nodules. The history and physical examination may be helpful in detecting thyroid nodules but are not useful in predicting malignancy. Furthermore, laboratory studies, ultrasonography and nuclear medicine scans do not reliably differentiate between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. In most cases, fine-needle aspiration biopsy can accurately identify malignant thyroid nodules. Fine- needle aspiration biopsy is safe and can be performed in an office setting.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027966091&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027966091&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

VL - 50

SP - 785

EP - 790

JO - American Family Physician

JF - American Family Physician

SN - 0002-838X

IS - 4

ER -