Managing biomass feedstocks: Selection of satellite storage locations for different harvesting systems

D. Brownell, Jude Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biomass feedstocks including switchgrass and corn stover are currently being considered for use in direct combustion systems, and for value-added products such as ethanol. A major roadblock associated with the utilization of biomass feedstocks is the high cost of handling and storage due to low bulk density of these feedstocks. A wide variety of existing harvest systems creates logistics difficulties for bioenergy industries. The utilization of herbaceous biomass materials requires low-cost handling systems to collect, store, and transport year round. This then requires selecting the most economical methods from various existing handling systems for loose and baled biomass materials. How these different harvesting systems can be integrated into a cost-effective supply system is a challenge. A method of selecting the lowest cost harvest and handling machine system was proposed; the model developed could calculate costs of different systems so as to assist field managers to select the best handling method for every point in a given location of a biorefinery plant. The results of the model calculation can provide users a map which shows the lowest-cost handling scenario for all handling systems analyzed by this program. This result will enable biorefinary industries and landowners to determine the most cost-effective way to harvest, store, and transport biomass materials according to the size of the biorefinery plant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)74-81
Number of pages8
JournalAgricultural Engineering International: CIGR Journal
Volume14
Issue number1
StatePublished - Sep 7 2012

Fingerprint

feedstocks
Feedstocks
Biomass
Satellites
biomass
biorefining
Costs
bioenergy industry
value-added products
Panicum virgatum
corn stover
landowners
combustion
bulk density
managers
methodology
ethanol
industry
Logistics
Industry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Energy (miscellaneous)
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

@article{948f200424c142feaf98b93981951ce0,
title = "Managing biomass feedstocks: Selection of satellite storage locations for different harvesting systems",
abstract = "Biomass feedstocks including switchgrass and corn stover are currently being considered for use in direct combustion systems, and for value-added products such as ethanol. A major roadblock associated with the utilization of biomass feedstocks is the high cost of handling and storage due to low bulk density of these feedstocks. A wide variety of existing harvest systems creates logistics difficulties for bioenergy industries. The utilization of herbaceous biomass materials requires low-cost handling systems to collect, store, and transport year round. This then requires selecting the most economical methods from various existing handling systems for loose and baled biomass materials. How these different harvesting systems can be integrated into a cost-effective supply system is a challenge. A method of selecting the lowest cost harvest and handling machine system was proposed; the model developed could calculate costs of different systems so as to assist field managers to select the best handling method for every point in a given location of a biorefinery plant. The results of the model calculation can provide users a map which shows the lowest-cost handling scenario for all handling systems analyzed by this program. This result will enable biorefinary industries and landowners to determine the most cost-effective way to harvest, store, and transport biomass materials according to the size of the biorefinery plant.",
author = "D. Brownell and Jude Liu",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
day = "7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "74--81",
journal = "Agricultural Engineering International: CIGR Journal",
issn = "1682-1130",
publisher = "International Commission of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering",
number = "1",

}

Managing biomass feedstocks : Selection of satellite storage locations for different harvesting systems. / Brownell, D.; Liu, Jude.

In: Agricultural Engineering International: CIGR Journal, Vol. 14, No. 1, 07.09.2012, p. 74-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Managing biomass feedstocks

T2 - Selection of satellite storage locations for different harvesting systems

AU - Brownell, D.

AU - Liu, Jude

PY - 2012/9/7

Y1 - 2012/9/7

N2 - Biomass feedstocks including switchgrass and corn stover are currently being considered for use in direct combustion systems, and for value-added products such as ethanol. A major roadblock associated with the utilization of biomass feedstocks is the high cost of handling and storage due to low bulk density of these feedstocks. A wide variety of existing harvest systems creates logistics difficulties for bioenergy industries. The utilization of herbaceous biomass materials requires low-cost handling systems to collect, store, and transport year round. This then requires selecting the most economical methods from various existing handling systems for loose and baled biomass materials. How these different harvesting systems can be integrated into a cost-effective supply system is a challenge. A method of selecting the lowest cost harvest and handling machine system was proposed; the model developed could calculate costs of different systems so as to assist field managers to select the best handling method for every point in a given location of a biorefinery plant. The results of the model calculation can provide users a map which shows the lowest-cost handling scenario for all handling systems analyzed by this program. This result will enable biorefinary industries and landowners to determine the most cost-effective way to harvest, store, and transport biomass materials according to the size of the biorefinery plant.

AB - Biomass feedstocks including switchgrass and corn stover are currently being considered for use in direct combustion systems, and for value-added products such as ethanol. A major roadblock associated with the utilization of biomass feedstocks is the high cost of handling and storage due to low bulk density of these feedstocks. A wide variety of existing harvest systems creates logistics difficulties for bioenergy industries. The utilization of herbaceous biomass materials requires low-cost handling systems to collect, store, and transport year round. This then requires selecting the most economical methods from various existing handling systems for loose and baled biomass materials. How these different harvesting systems can be integrated into a cost-effective supply system is a challenge. A method of selecting the lowest cost harvest and handling machine system was proposed; the model developed could calculate costs of different systems so as to assist field managers to select the best handling method for every point in a given location of a biorefinery plant. The results of the model calculation can provide users a map which shows the lowest-cost handling scenario for all handling systems analyzed by this program. This result will enable biorefinary industries and landowners to determine the most cost-effective way to harvest, store, and transport biomass materials according to the size of the biorefinery plant.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84865694287&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84865694287&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84865694287

VL - 14

SP - 74

EP - 81

JO - Agricultural Engineering International: CIGR Journal

JF - Agricultural Engineering International: CIGR Journal

SN - 1682-1130

IS - 1

ER -