Managing Countertransference

Jeffrey Hayes, Charles J. Gelso, Ann M. Hummel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter reviews the history and definition of countertransference, as well as empirical research on countertransference, its management, and the relation of both to psychotherapy outcome. Three meta-analyses are presented as are select studies that illustrate findings from the meta-analyses. Conclusions are that countertransference reactions are related inversely and modestly to psychotherapy outcome, particular therapist qualities and practices are associated with effective countertransference management, and managing countertransference successfully is related to better therapy outcomes. This chapter concludes by summarizing the limitations of the research base and by highlighting the therapeutic practices predicated on that research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPsychotherapy Relationships That Work
Subtitle of host publicationEvidence-Based Responsiveness
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199894635
ISBN (Print)9780199737208
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

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Psychotherapy
Meta-Analysis
Empirical Research
Research
History
Countertransference (Psychology)
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Hayes, J., Gelso, C. J., & Hummel, A. M. (2011). Managing Countertransference. In Psychotherapy Relationships That Work: Evidence-Based Responsiveness Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199737208.003.0012
Hayes, Jeffrey ; Gelso, Charles J. ; Hummel, Ann M. / Managing Countertransference. Psychotherapy Relationships That Work: Evidence-Based Responsiveness. Oxford University Press, 2011.
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Hayes, J, Gelso, CJ & Hummel, AM 2011, Managing Countertransference. in Psychotherapy Relationships That Work: Evidence-Based Responsiveness. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199737208.003.0012

Managing Countertransference. / Hayes, Jeffrey; Gelso, Charles J.; Hummel, Ann M.

Psychotherapy Relationships That Work: Evidence-Based Responsiveness. Oxford University Press, 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Hayes J, Gelso CJ, Hummel AM. Managing Countertransference. In Psychotherapy Relationships That Work: Evidence-Based Responsiveness. Oxford University Press. 2011 https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199737208.003.0012