Mannose-displaying fluorescent framboidal nanoparticles containing phenylboronic acid groups as a potential drug carrier for macrophage targeting

Urara Hasegawa, Ryosuke Inubushi, Hiroshi Uyama, Taro Uematsu, Susumu Kuwabata, André J. van der Vlies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Functional polymeric nanoparticles have been used for various applications in the biomaterials field. Recently, we reported phenylboronic acid-containing nanoparticles (PBA NPs) having an unique framboidal morphology, prepared in a single-step by the aqueous dispersion polymerization of N-acryloyl-3-aminophenylboronic acid (PBAAM) in the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) acrylamide (PEGAM) as a polymerizable dispersant and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBAM) as a crosslinker. In this study, we prepared mannosylated and fluorescent PBA NPs that could be used for different applications such as drug delivery and bioimaging. Fluorescent PBA NPs were synthesized by including the fluorescent Nile Blue acrylamide monomer in the reaction mixture during the dispersion polymerization of PBAAM. By using a carboxyl group-bearing PEGAM dispersant, carboxyl group-bearing PBA NPs were prepared that were modified with mannosamine to yield mannosylated PBA NPs. Cellular uptake studies showed that the mannosylated PBA NPs were selectively taken up by murine RAW264.7 macrophages. These results show that PBA NPs allow for flexible modification with various functionalities and could therefore be a potential platform for targeted delivery of drugs to macrophages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1174-1181
Number of pages8
JournalColloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces
Volume136
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

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