March Market Madness: The Impact of Value-Irrelevant Events on the Market Pricing of Earnings News

Michael S. Drake, Kurt Gee, Jacob R. Thornock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Each year, the NCAA basketball tournament (March Madness) is a daytime distraction for millions of people, providing a largely exogenous shock to investor attention. We investigate whether March Madness influences the market response to earnings by diverting investor attention away from earnings news. We find that the price reaction to earnings news released during March Madness is muted. This result generally holds across several samples and additional analyses. We also find that the result is more muted for low institutional ownership firms, consistent with the effect being driven by less-sophisticated investors. Furthermore, we find that it takes the market 30 to 60 days to correct for the distraction effect. Overall, we provide a unique test of the theory of limited attention by documenting that extraneous events can have a significant impact on the pricing of earnings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-203
Number of pages32
JournalContemporary Accounting Research
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Pricing
News
Investors
Tournament
Basketball
Price reaction
Institutional ownership
Market response
Limited attention
Exogenous shocks

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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March Market Madness : The Impact of Value-Irrelevant Events on the Market Pricing of Earnings News. / Drake, Michael S.; Gee, Kurt; Thornock, Jacob R.

In: Contemporary Accounting Research, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 172-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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