Marijuana use during pregnancy and breastfeeding

Implications for neonatal and childhood outcomes

Sheryl Ryan, Seth D. Ammerman, Mary E. O'Connor, Stephen W. Patrick, Jennifer Plumb, Joanna Quigley, Leslie Walker-Harding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Marijuana is one of the most widely used substances during pregnancy in the United States. Emerging data on the ability of cannabinoids to cross the placenta and affect the development of the fetus raise concerns about both pregnancy outcomes and long-Term consequences for the infant or child. Social media is used to tout the use of marijuana for severe nausea associated with pregnancy. Concerns have also been raised about marijuana use by breastfeeding mothers. With this clinical report, we provide data on the current rates of marijuana use among pregnant and lactating women, discuss what is known about the effects of marijuana on fetal development and later neurodevelopmental and behavioral outcomes, and address implications for education and policy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20181889
JournalPediatrics
Volume142
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Fingerprint

Cannabis
Breast Feeding
Pregnancy
Social Media
Aptitude
Cannabinoids
Pregnancy Outcome
Fetal Development
Nausea
Placenta
Pregnant Women
Fetus
Mothers
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Ryan, S., Ammerman, S. D., O'Connor, M. E., Patrick, S. W., Plumb, J., Quigley, J., & Walker-Harding, L. (2018). Marijuana use during pregnancy and breastfeeding: Implications for neonatal and childhood outcomes. Pediatrics, 142(3), [e20181889]. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2018-1889
Ryan, Sheryl ; Ammerman, Seth D. ; O'Connor, Mary E. ; Patrick, Stephen W. ; Plumb, Jennifer ; Quigley, Joanna ; Walker-Harding, Leslie. / Marijuana use during pregnancy and breastfeeding : Implications for neonatal and childhood outcomes. In: Pediatrics. 2018 ; Vol. 142, No. 3.
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Ryan, S, Ammerman, SD, O'Connor, ME, Patrick, SW, Plumb, J, Quigley, J & Walker-Harding, L 2018, 'Marijuana use during pregnancy and breastfeeding: Implications for neonatal and childhood outcomes', Pediatrics, vol. 142, no. 3, e20181889. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2018-1889

Marijuana use during pregnancy and breastfeeding : Implications for neonatal and childhood outcomes. / Ryan, Sheryl; Ammerman, Seth D.; O'Connor, Mary E.; Patrick, Stephen W.; Plumb, Jennifer; Quigley, Joanna; Walker-Harding, Leslie.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 142, No. 3, e20181889, 01.09.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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