Marital transitions among Vietnam-era repatriated prisoners of war

Catherine L. Cohan, Steven Cole, Joanne Davila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined (i) whether marital outcomes in the 20 years following repatriation for 98 former Vietnam War prisoners of war (POW) differed from a matched comparison group of 98 Vietnam-era Navy aviators who did not experience captivity, and (ii) individual differences that contributed to vulnerability for divorce among the POWs and 56 of their wives. POWs had a higher divorce rate than the comparison sample, particularly in the 2 years following repatriation. POWs were more likely to divorce when they were younger, had shorter marriages, and had wives with lower marital satisfaction and more financial Stressors. Marriage can be a casualty of war, even among those who are high functioning and have many personal advantages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)777-795
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Fingerprint

Prisoners of War
Aviators
prisoner of war
Divorce
Vietnam
divorce
remigration
Marriage
Spouses
wife
marriage
Vietnam War
navy
Individuality
vulnerability
Research Design
experience
Group
Warfare

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Marital transitions among Vietnam-era repatriated prisoners of war. / Cohan, Catherine L.; Cole, Steven; Davila, Joanne.

In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 22, No. 6, 01.12.2005, p. 777-795.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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