Mate retention behavior modulates men's preferences for self-resemblance in infant faces

Lisa L.M. Welling, Robert P. Burriss, David Andrew Puts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Visual assessments of relatedness may affect paternal investment decisions and altruistic behaviors. Work examining preferences for cues to self-resemblance in child faces has been equivocal, with findings showing that men have a higher preference than women, that preference for self-resemblance was statistically significant in women but not men, and that both men and women have a significant preference for self-resemblance when making parental investment decisions. Using data from 67 heterosexual romantic couples, we present evidence that both men and women prefer self-resembling infants, but show no significant preference for partner-resembling infants. Moreover, men's intersexual negative inducement tactics were correlated with, and significantly predicted, their preferences for self-resembling infants. These findings provide evidence that, although both men and women show a general preference for self-resemblance in infant faces, men's preferences for self-resemblance may be further modulated by perceived threat of cuckoldry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-126
Number of pages9
JournalEvolution and Human Behavior
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

Fingerprint

extra-pair copulation
parental investment
relatedness
Heterosexuality
infant
woman
Retention (Psychology)
Resemblance
Mate
Cues
decision
Tactics
Threat

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Mate retention behavior modulates men's preferences for self-resemblance in infant faces. / Welling, Lisa L.M.; Burriss, Robert P.; Puts, David Andrew.

In: Evolution and Human Behavior, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.03.2011, p. 118-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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