Maternal and Infant Temperament Characteristics as Contributors to Parenting Stress in the First Year Postpartum

Kate B. Oddi, Kyle Murdock, Sarah Vadnais, David J. Bridgett, Maria A. Gartstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although prominent models emphasize that maternal, child, and situational variables are associated with parenting stress, previous research has often neglected to examine associations between maternal and infant temperament characteristics and stress experienced in the parenting role. Additionally, while predictors of global parenting stress have been examined, predictors of stress related to specific aspects of the parenting role have been largely unexplored. The present study examined maternal and infant temperament characteristics as predictors of parenting stress, both globally and specifically. Mothers (n=159) completed measures of depressive and anxiety symptoms and a measure of adult temperament when their infants were 4months old. At 6months postpartum, caregivers completed a measure of infant temperament, and at 8months postpartum, a measure of parenting stress. Results indicated that maternal effortful control and infant negative emotionality predicted global maternal parenting stress. Additionally, all maternal and infant temperament variables, with the exception of maternal negative affectivity and infant surgency/extraversion, were uniquely predictive of at least one specific aspect of parenting-related stress. Findings emphasize the importance of considering maternal and infant temperament characteristics as contributors to parenting stress in the first year postpartum. Implications of these findings for future research and intervention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)553-579
Number of pages27
JournalInfant and Child Development
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

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Temperament
Parenting
Postpartum Period
Mothers
Caregivers
Anxiety
Depression

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Oddi, Kate B. ; Murdock, Kyle ; Vadnais, Sarah ; Bridgett, David J. ; Gartstein, Maria A. / Maternal and Infant Temperament Characteristics as Contributors to Parenting Stress in the First Year Postpartum. In: Infant and Child Development. 2013 ; Vol. 22, No. 6. pp. 553-579.
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Maternal and Infant Temperament Characteristics as Contributors to Parenting Stress in the First Year Postpartum. / Oddi, Kate B.; Murdock, Kyle; Vadnais, Sarah; Bridgett, David J.; Gartstein, Maria A.

In: Infant and Child Development, Vol. 22, No. 6, 01.11.2013, p. 553-579.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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